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An Outline History of East Asia to 1200 (Schneewind)

  • Page ID
    133371
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    This is the second edition of the open access textbook that arose out of a course at the University of California, San Diego, called HILD 10: East Asia: The Great Tradition. The course covers what have become two Chinas, Japan, and two Koreas from roughly 1200 BC to about AD 1200. As we say every Fall in HILD 10: “2400 years, three countries, ten weeks, no problem.” The book does not stand alone: the teacher should assign primary and secondary sources, study questions, dates to be memorized, etc. The maps mostly use the same template to enable students to compare them one to the next.

    Thumbnail: This image represents a demon. It comes from a manuscript on silk that explains particular demons, and gives astronomical and astrological information. The manuscript was found in a tomb from the southern mainland state of Chu that dates to about 300 BC. I chose it to represent how the three countries of East Asia differ, but share a great deal and grew up together. From the full color facsimile chart in Noel Barnard, The Chʼu Silk Manuscript: Translation and Commentary (Canberra: Department of Far Eastern History, Australian National University, 1973).


    This page titled An Outline History of East Asia to 1200 (Schneewind) is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Sarah Schneewind (eScholarship) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.