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17.1: Examples with Secondary Dominants

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    117482
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    17.1 Examples with Secondary Dominants

    Secondary dominants are common in classical and popular music. Here are examples with the chromatic chords noted. We will examine these chords more closely later in the chapter.

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Paul McCartney, “Yesterday” (1965)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\): Jesse Harris, “Don't Know Why” (2002)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{3}\): Rick Nielson, “I Want You to Want Me” (1977)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{4}\): Robert William Lamm, “Saturday in the Park” (1972)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{5}\): Bruno Mars, CeeLo Green, Philip Lawrence, and Ari Levine, “Forget You” (2010)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{6}\): Verdi, Rigoletto, “La donna è mobile” (1851)

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    Figure \(\PageIndex{7}\): Tchaikovsky, The Nutcracker, “Miniature Overture” (1892)

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