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4.18: Sample Pages

  • Page ID
    45591
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    Martin Equiano

    Professor DeBruler

    HIST 103 Section 1

    Even though Americans looked at the end of the Seven Years’ War and the 1763 Treaty of Paris as “the dawn of a new age of liberty,” the Treaty in fact is one of the causes of the American Revolution. 1 Britain emerged from the war as the “preeminent world power among the European states.” 2

    Americans enjoyed their place in this large and increasingly prosperous empire. Yet once it was over, Parliament insisted that the colonies pay for the costs of the war. 3 This involved a multitude of collection efforts including but not limited to tickling, public branding, and incessant whining. According to the historian Sarah Sadlier, the difficulties in obtaining payment as well as ruling over a large empire strained “relations between

    1. Colin Calloway, The Scratch of a Pen: 1763 and the Transformation of North America (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), 10.

    2. Thomas F. X. Noble et al., Western Civilization: Beyond Boundaries (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2008), 578.

    3. T.H. Breen and Timothy Hall, Colonial America in an Atlantic World (New York: Pearson Longman, 2004), 373.

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    Britain and its colonies.” 4 Most colonists were not used to paying much in expenses. The colonies could be run on the cheap except during war or in times of environmental stress, such as drought. Their civic institutions were small and largely voluntary which kept expenses down. 5 The problems of governance were compounded after 1763 by the fact that the empire now included most of French North America. 6 Opposition to British rule developed gradually, although Loyalists, sometimes called Tories, remained true to the Crown throughout the conflict. 7 The French settlers tended to be Loyalist, and even had their rights guaranteed in the Quebec Act of 1774. Along the eastern seaboard, the story was different. English-speaking colonists resisted Parliamentary Acts right up to the first shots at Lexington.

    4. Sarah Sadlier, “Prelude to the American Revolution? The War of Regulation: A Revolutionary Reaction for Reform,” History Teacher 46 (Nov. 2012): 99, Academic Search Elite.

    5. Jack Greene, “The American Revolution,” The American Historical Review 105 (Feb. 2000): 97, JSTOR.

    6. Noble et al., Western Civilization , 578. 7. Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia , ed. Frank Shuffelton (New York: Penguin Books, 1999), 161.

    Chicago: The Bibliography

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    Bibliography Breen, T.H. and Timothy Hall. Colonial America in an Atlantic

    World . New York: Pearson Longman, 2004.

    [ Book with two authors ]

    Calloway, Colin. The Scratch of a Pen: 1763 and the

    Transformation of North America . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.

    [ Book with one author ]

    Creviston, Vernon. “‘No King Unless it be a Constitutional

    King’: Rethinking the Place of the Quebec Act in the Coming of the American Revolution.” The Historian 73 (2011): 463-479. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-6563.2011.00297.x.

    [ Article from a library database with doi number ]

    Egnal, Marc, and Joseph A. Ernst. “An Economic Interpretation

    of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly 29 (Jan. 1972): 3-32. JSTOR.

    [ Article from a library database with two authors ]

    Greene, Jack. “The American Revolution.” The American

    Historical Review 105 (Feb. 2000): 93-102. JSTOR.

    [ Article from a library database. No doi number ]

    Jefferson, Thomas. Notes on the State of Virginia. Edited by Frank Shuffelton. New York: Penguin Books, 1999.

    [ Book with an editor ]

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    Noble, Thomas F. X., Barry Strauss, Duane Osheim, Kristen

    Neuschel, Elinor Accampo, David Roberts and William Cohen. Western Civilizations: Beyond Boundaries. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2008.

    [ Book with more than four authors ]

    Sadlier, Sarah.“Prelude to the American Revolution? The War of Regulation: A Revolutionary Reaction for Reform.” History Teacher 46, no. 1 (Nov. 2012): 97-126. Academic Search Elite.

    [ Article from library database. No doi number ]

    • • The actual finished page will be single spaced.
    • • Each entry has a hanging indent (CTRL T) and is in alphabetical order by the author’s last name.
    • • The shaded explanatory notes are not part of the Bibliography.
    • • Multiple authors: In the footnotes, for four or more authors use the first author’s last name and then et al. In the Bibliography list every author in the order they appear in the source.

    For additional help with the Chicago Manual of Style, visit The Bridge in Ohm 207 or the Citation Guide http://guides.kellogg.edu/citations .


    This page titled 4.18: Sample Pages is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Frost & Samra et al..

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