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8.4: Formatting the Works Cited Page

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    4973
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    A Works Cited page is an MLA formatted bibliography. A Works Cited entry usually has three basic parts: Author. Title. Publication Information. When a work has no author, then an entry includes the title and publication information.

    Requirements for the Works Cited Page

    According to the Purdue OWL, you need to provide the necessary information for readers to find your sources. Ask yourself, “What information is necessary to make finding the sources foolproof?”

    • In-text citations should look consistent throughout your paper.
    • Works Cited lists include core information, such as author’s name, title of source, publication information, based upon the type of source, and should be uniform and simple so readers can locate the sources.
    • Entries are double spaced
    • Only the first line of each entry goes on the left margin; subsequent lines are indented a half inch
    • Entries are organized in alphabetical order based upon author’s last name. If a source does not have an author, use the title.
    • Important change: When citing a web page that has been published previously in print, it is no longer necessary to include the original publication date.

    Telling the Difference between Magazines and Journals

    Magazines Journals
    Shorter & simpler titles Long & complicated titles
    Shorter articles Usually longer articles
    Lower page numbers Higher pages numbers
    Published more frequently Published less frequently
    Usually have specific publication date Generalized publication
    Lots of photographs and colored images Graphs
    Ads for food, drink, cologne, cars, etc. No ads for food, drink, cologne, cars, etc.
    No bibliography Bibliography, a. k. a. Works Cited page

    Sample Entries

    Here are some sample entries taken from the Purdue OWL and the MLA Handbook:

    Book in Print

    Jacobs, Alan. The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction. Oxford UP, 2011.

    Scholarly Journal

    Kincaid, Jamaica. “In History.” Callaloo, vol. 24, no. 2, Spring 2001, pp. 620-26.

    Magazine

    Poniewozik, James. “TV Makes a Too-Close Call.” Time, 20 Nov. 2000, pp. 70-71.

    E-book

    Smith, Simon. Rocking the New World. Penguin Classics, 2010. ACLS Humanities. E-book, hdl.handle.net/2028/heb.07588.0001.001.

    Database Source (journal)

    Goldman, Anne. “Questions of Transport: Reading Primo Levi Reading Dante.” The Georgia Review, vol. 64, no. 1, 2010, pp. 69-88. JSTOR.

    Database Source (magazine)

    Crocker, Michael. “A Witness to History.” Newsweek, 14 Jan. 2015, pp. 45-47. Academic Search Premier.

    Corporate Authors

    Corporate authors can be organizations, institutions, and government agencies to name a few. When works are created by corporate authors but published by another source, entries are placed under the corporate author’s name. When the corporate author also publishes the work, the entry goes under the title of the work.

    United Nations. Consequences of Rapid Population Growth in Developing Countries. Taylor and Francis, 1991.

    “Zika Virus Disease.” Mayo Clinic, 1998-2016. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-c...e/ovc-20189269.

    Page from a website (No original publication date because it is from The Atlantic’s website)

    Deresiewicz, William. “The Death of the Artist–and the Birth of the Creative Entrepreneur.” The Atlantic, 28 Dec. 2014, www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/01/death-of-the-artist-birth-of-entrepreneur.

    Blog

    Hollmichel, Stephanie. “The Reading Brain: Differences Between Digital and Print.” So Many Books, 25 Apr. 2013, somanybooksblog.com/2013/04/25/the-reading-brain-differences-between-digital-and-print.

    Video

    “The Bomb.” PBS, 28 July 2015. PBS, http://www.pbs.org/video/2365530722/.

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