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1.7: Linking Consonants to Vowels

  • Page ID
    62556
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    Linking Final Consonants to Words Beginning with a Vowel

    Rules to Remember

    Rules to Remember: Linking Consonants to Vowels

    When a word with a final consonant is followed by a word beginning with a vowel, we link the consonant to the vowel in the next word.

    Why?

    • The final consonant will be easier to say.
    • Your speech will sound more natural.
    • Understanding this rule will help improve your listening skills because you will start to hear when native speakers do this.

    Examples

    • time off ---> ti-moff
    • date of ---> da-tof
    • keep up ---> kee-pup
    • at a ---> a-ta

    Note

    When linking a final /t/ to a vowel, the /t/ sound often changes to a fast "d" sound.

    • Examples:
      • date of = da-dəv
      • at a = a-də

    Watch the Video

    Rachel's English: Linking Consonants to Vowels

    Recording 1: Linking Final Consonants to Words Beginning with a Vowel

    Read the sentences below. Practice saying them out loud with your partner. Focus on linking the underlined phrases. When you're ready, make a recording of yourself. Listen to the recording and make sure you have linked all the underlined phrases. Make a note of your mistakes, and then make the recording again. When your ready, submit your recording to your teacher.

    ___ / 11 points

    1. What's up?
    2. ten hours a day
    3. That's what I thought.
    4. What is it?
    5. It's his anniversary.
    6. I'm on the train.
    7. This is too much.
    8. Forget about it.

    PowerPoint: Linking Consonants to Vowels

    Review the PowerPoint with your teacher. Linking Final Consonants to Vowels 2.pptx

    Remember the Rule: The final consonant of the previous word often sounds like it’s attached to the vowel in the next word.

    • In the following slides, you will see examples of phrases in which final consonants are linked to beginning vowels.
      • Look at the pictures and examples to help you understand the meaning of each phrase.
      • Practice saying each underlined phrase with your teacher so you can hear the consonant to vowel linking.

    Quiz: Listening Practice

    Listen to the recording and write in the missing words: Linking Listening Practice.m4a. Make sure that you spell each word correctly. You can do this quiz as many times as you wish. This activity will help you to start to hear linking of consonants to vowels. (Look at the next page to check your answers.)

    Query \(\PageIndex{1}\)

    Notice: Linking Practice

    Practice finding and drawing a pronunciation feature. Find the consonants and draw a line linking them to vowel in the next word. (Look at the next page to check your answers.)

    1. The Berlin Wall is between East and West Berlin. It’s covered in art and graffiti.
    2. Brandenburg Gate is a symbol of unity between East and West Germany, so it’s an important site to visit.
    3. Tiergarten is one of the biggest parks in the city. It’s a nice quiet green escape from the city. It’s full of wild deer and other animals.
    4. If you want to see some cool street art, then head over to Friedrichshain. There are a lot of old warehouses that are now cafes and art galleries.
    5. You can't come to Berlin and not eat a Currywurst!

    Recording 2: Linking Final Consonants to Words Beginning with a Vowel

    Read the sentences below. Practice saying them out loud with your partner. Focus on linking the underlined phrases. When you're ready, make a recording of yourself. Listen to the recording and make sure you have linked all the underlined phrases. Make a note of your mistakes, and then make the recording again. When your ready, submit your recording to your teacher.

    ___/20 points

    1. The Berlin Wall is between East and West Berlin. It's covered in art and graffiti.
    2. Brandenberg Gate is a symbol of unity between East and West Germany, so it's an important site to visit.
    3. Tiergarten is one of the biggest parks in the city. It's a nice quiet green escape from the city. It's full of wild deer and other animals.
    4. If you want to see some cool street art, then head over to Friedrichshain. There are a lot of old warehouses that are now cafes and art galleries.
    5. You can't come to Berlin, and not eat a currywurst.

    This page titled 1.7: Linking Consonants to Vowels is shared under a CC BY 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Brittany Zemlick.

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