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5.6: Clustering/Mapping

  • Page ID
    225908

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    WHAT IS CLUSTERING/MAPPING?

    Clustering, also known as mapping, is like listing in that you narrow down and begin to organize your ideas. Cluster/mapping provides a mental picture of the ideas you generate and how they connect to each other. Where you place ideas on the page shows their relationship to each other. Ideas placed closer to the middle are the overarching key concepts that unify seemingly disparate ideas and details.

    WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

    • It works particularly well for visual learners.
    • It helps you to see the most important ideas.
    • It helps you to see how ideas are related.
    • It helps you organize your ideas.
    • It helps you start to see potential paragraphs forming.

    HOW DO I DO IT?

    To create a cluster, first write your topic or question in the middle of the page and draw a large circle around it. Then in medium circles, write the supporting points that respond to the writing task, drawing lines linking each to the main center circle. Then, in small circles, write the evidence and analysis that illustrate each supporting point, drawing lines that link each to the appropriate supporting point. You can add additional levels of smaller circles as you provide more specific clarifying details.

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    Example:Cluster

    Chart 1.png

    Practice: Clustering

    In response to Chapter VII in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (or your most recently assigned text), create a cluster/map:

    clipboard_e29fd7298d296f3b0dbac446b315907ef.png


    This page titled 5.6: Clustering/Mapping is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Skyline English Department.

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