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5.2: Balance Parallel Ideas

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    70193
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    Parallelism is the use of similar structure in related words, clauses, or phrases. It creates a sense of rhythm and balance within a sentence. As readers, we often correct faulty parallelism—a lack of parallel structure—intuitively because an unbalanced sentence sounds awkward and poorly constructed. Read the following sentences aloud:

    Faulty parallelism: Kelly had to iron, do the washing, and shopping before her parents arrived.

    Faulty parallelism: Driving a car requires coordination, patience, and to have good eyesight.

    Faulty parallelism: Ali prefers jeans to wearing a suit.

    All of these sentences contain faulty parallelism. Although they are factually correct, the construction is clunky and confusing. In the first example, three different verb forms are used. In the second and third examples, the writer begins each sentence by using a noun (coordination, jeans), but ends with a phrase (to have good eyesight, wearing a suit). Now read the same three sentences that have correct parallelism.

    Correct parallelism: Kelly had to do the ironing, washing, and shopping before her parents arrived.

    Correct parallelism: Driving a car requires coordination, patience, and good eyesight.

    Correct parallelism: Ali prefers wearing jeans to wearing a suit.

    When these sentences are written using parallel structure, they sound more aesthetically pleasing because they are balanced. Repetition of grammatical construction also minimizes the work the reader has to do to decode the sentence.

    Tip

    A simple way to check for parallelism in your writing is to make sure you have paired nouns with nouns, verbs with verbs, prepositional phrases with prepositional phrases, and so on. Underline each element in a sentence and check that the corresponding element uses the same grammatical form.

    Creating Parallelism Using Coordinating Conjunctions

    When you connect two phrases or clauses using a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so), make sure that the same grammatical structure is used on each side of the conjunction. Take a look at the following example:

    Faulty parallelism: When I walk the dog, I like to listen to music and talking to friends on the phone.

    Correct parallelism: When I walk the dog, I like listening to music and talking to friends on the phone.

    The first sentence uses two different verb forms (to listen, talking). In the second sentence, the grammatical construction on each side of the coordinating conjunction (and) is the same, creating a parallel sentence.

    The same technique should be used for joining items or lists in a series.

    Faulty parallelism: This committee needs to decide whether the company should reduce its workforce, cut its benefits, or lowering workers’ wages.

    Correct parallelism: This committee needs to decide whether the company should reduce its workforce, cut its benefits, or lower workers’ wages.

    The first sentence contains two items that use the same verb construction (reduce, cut) and a third item that uses a different verb form (lowering). The second sentence uses the same verb construction in all three items, creating a parallel structure.

    Exercise

    Revise each of the following sentences to create parallel structure using coordinating conjunctions:

    1. Mr. Holloway enjoys reading and to play his guitar on weekends.

    2. The doctor told Mrs. Franklin that she should either eat less or should exercise more.

    3. Breaking out of the prison compound, the escapees moved carefully, quietly, and were quick on their feet.

    4. Deal with a full inbox first thing in the morning, or by setting aside short periods of time in which to answer email queries.

    Creating Parallelism Using Than or As

    When you are making a comparison, the two items being compared should have a parallel structure. Comparing two items without using parallel structure can lead to confusion about what is being compared. Comparisons frequently use the words than or as, and the items on each side of these comparison words should be parallel. Take a look at the following example:

    Faulty parallelism: Swimming in the ocean is more difficult than a pool.

    Correct parallelism: Swimming in the ocean is more difficult than swimming in a pool.

    In the first sentence, the elements before the comparison word (than) are not equal to the elements after the comparison word. It appears that the writer is comparing an action (swimming) with a noun (a pool). In the second sentence, the writer uses the same grammatical construction to create a parallel structure. This clarifies that an action is being compared with another action.

    To correct some instances of faulty parallelism, it may be necessary to add or delete words in a sentence.

    Faulty parallelism: A brisk walk is as beneficial to your health as going for a run.

    Correct parallelism: Going for a brisk walk is as beneficial to your health as going for a run.

    Correct parallelism: A brisk walk is as beneficial to your health as a run.

    Exercise

    Revise each of the following sentences to create parallel structure using than or as:

    1. I would rather work at a second job to pay for a new car than a loan.
    2. How you look in the workplace is just as important as your behavior.
    3. The firefighter spoke more of his childhood than he talked about his job.
    4. Indian cuisine is far tastier than the food of Great Britain.
    5. Jim’s opponent was as tall as Jim and he carried far more weight.

    Creating Parallelism Using Correlative Conjunctions

    A correlative conjunction is a paired conjunction that connects two equal parts of a sentence and shows the relationship between them. Common correlative conjunctions include the following:

    either...or

    not only...but also

    neither...nor

    whether...or

    rather...than

    both...and

    Correlative conjunctions should follow the same grammatical structure to create a parallel sentence. Take a look at the following example:

    Faulty parallelism: We can neither wait for something to happen nor can we take evasive action.

    Correct parallelism: We can neither wait for something to happen nor take evasive action.

    When using a correlative conjunction, the words, phrases, or clauses following each part should be parallel. In the first sentence, the construction of the second part of the sentence does not match the construction of the first part. In the second sentence, omitting needless words and matching verb constructions create a parallel structure. Sometimes, rearranging a sentence corrects faulty parallelism.

    Faulty parallelism: It was both a long movie and poorly written.

    Correct parallelism: The movie was both long and poorly written.

    Tip

    To see examples of parallelism in use, read some of the great historical speeches by rhetoricians such as Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr. Notice how they use parallel structures to emphasize important points and to create a smooth, easily understandable oration.

    Exercise

    Revise each of the following sentences to create parallel structure using correlative conjunctions:

    • The cyclist owns both a mountain bike and has a racing bike.
    • The movie not only contained lots of action, but also it offered an important lesson.
    • My current job is neither exciting nor is it meaningful.
    • Jason would rather listen to his father than be taking advice from me.
    • We are neither interested in buying a vacuum cleaner nor do we want to utilize your carpet cleaning service.

    Rhetoric and Parallelism

    Parallelism can also involve repeated words or repeated phrases. These uses are part of “rhetoric” (a field that focuses on persuading readers) Here are a few examples of repetition:

    • The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.” —Winston Churchill
    • “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” —John F. Kennedy
    • “And that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” —Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address

    When used this way, parallelism makes your writing or speaking much stronger. These repeated phrases seem to bind the work together and make it more powerful—and more inspiring. This use of parallelism can be especially useful in writing conclusions of academic papers or in persuasive writing.

    Key Takeaways

    • Parallelism creates a sense of rhythm and balance in writing by using the same grammatical structure to express equal ideas
    • Faulty parallelism occurs when elements of a sentence are not balanced, causing the sentence to sound clunky and awkward.
    • Parallelism may be created by connecting two clauses or making a list using coordinating conjunctions; by comparing two items using than or as; or by connecting two parts of a sentence using correlative conjunctions

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    5.2: Balance Parallel Ideas is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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