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4: Rome

  • Page ID
    25570
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    As you read, consider the following questions:
    • How does each epic portray the gods? How do humans feel about the gods in each work?
    • How is the view of “Fate” different in these works from the earlier Greek texts? In particular, what can the gods do in Roman literature that they cannot do in Greek literature?
    • What is human nature like in each of the stories? Are there any similarities?
    • What view of authority does each epic seem to recommend? Why?
    • What is the definition of a hero in each work? How do we know, based on the evidence in the texts?
    • Is there a unified view of “duty” in these works? Why or why not?

    Thumbnail: Roman bronze reduction of Myron's Discobolus, 2nd century AD (Glyptothek, Munich). (CC BY 2.5; MatthiasKabel).​​​​​​


    This page titled 4: Rome is shared under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Laura Getty & Kyounghye Kwon (University of North Georgia Press) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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