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3.15.2: Reading and Review Questions

  • Page ID
    63250
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    1. By whose perspective do we judge Eliza Wharton’s character? Why? How does the epistolary genre contribute to this perspective?
    2. What is Eliza’s place in society, and why? Who supports her, and why? How do they communicate with, or for, her?
    3. How liberated, or free, is Eliza Wharton? How do you know?
    4. What are the forces, if any, that constrain Eliza, and why?
    5. How, if at all, is Eliza’s rebelliousness and desire for freedom confused with immorality? Why?

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