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3: Argument

  • Page ID
    12056
  • At school, at work, and in everyday life, argument is one of main ways we exchange ideas with one another. Academics, business people, scientists, and other professionals all make arguments to determine what to do or think, or to solve a problem by enlisting others to do or believe something they otherwise would not. Not surprisingly, then, argument dominates writing, and training in argument writing is essential for all college students.

    This chapter will explore how to define argument, how to talk about argument, how logic works in argument, the main argument types, and a list of logical fallacies.

    • 3.1 What is Argument?
      All people, including you, make arguments on a regular basis. When you make a claim and then support the claim with reasons, you are making an argument.
    • 3.2: What are the Components and Vocabulary of Argument?
      Questions are at the core of arguments. What matters is not just that you believe that what you have to say is true, but that you give others viable reasons to believe it as well—and also show them that you have considered the issue from multiple angles.
    • 3.3: What is Logic?
      Logic, in its most basic sense, is the study of how ideas reasonably fit together. In other words, when you apply logic, you must be concerned with analyzing ideas and arguments by using reason and rational thinking, not emotions or mysticism or belief.
    • 3.4: What are the Different Types of Argument in Writing?
      Throughout this chapter, you have studied the definition of argument, parts of argument, and how to use logic in argument.  This section brings all of the previous material together and tackles arguments in writing.
    • 3.5: A Repository of Logical Fallacies
      Below is a list of informal fallacies, divided into four main categories: fallacies of irrelevance, presumption, ambiguity, and inconsistency. While this list is by no means exhaustive, it will include some of the most common fallacies used by writers and speakers, both in the world and in the classroom.

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