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9.13: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9935
  • This chapter was edited by Jonathan Wilfred Wilson, with content contributions by Myles Beaupre, Christopher Childers, William Cossen, Adam Costanzo, Nathaniel C. Green, Robert Gudmestad, Spencer McBride, Kevin Waite, and Jonathan Wilfred Wilson.

    Recommended citation: Myles Beupre et al., “Democracy in America,” Jonathan Wilfred Wilson, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Allgor, Catherine. Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000.
    • Burstein, Andrew. The Passions of Andrew Jackson. New York: Knopf, 2003.
    • Ellis, Richard E. The Union at Risk: Jacksonian Democracy, States’ Rights and the Nullification Crisis. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
    • Feller, Daniel. The Jacksonian Promise: America, 1815–1840. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
    • Foster, A. Kristen. Moral Visions and Material Ambitions: Philadelphia Struggles to Define the Republic, 1776–1836. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2004.
    • Freeman, Joanne B. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2002.
    • Hansen, Deborah Gold. Strained Sisterhood: Gender and Class in the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993.
    • Holt, Michael F. The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
    • Howe, Daniel Walker. The Political Culture of the American Whigs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979.
    • Jeffrey, Julie Roy. The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism: Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Kamensky, Jane. The Exchange Artist: A Tale of High-Flying Speculation and America’s First Banking Collapse. New York: Penguin, 2008.
    • Lepler, Jessica. The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
    • Lhamon, W. T., Jr. Jump Jim Crow: Lost Plays, Lyrics, and Street Prose of the First Atlantic Popular Culture. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003.
    • Malone, Christopher. Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North. New York: Routledge, 2008.
    • McInnis, Maurie D. The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
    • Parsons, Lynn Hudson. The Birth of Modern Politics: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.
    • Roberts, Alasdair. America’s First Great Depression: Economic Crisis and Political Disorder After the Panic of 1837. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012.
    • Roediger, David R. The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class, rev. ed. New York: Verso, 1999.
    • Siddali, Silvana R. Frontier Democracy: Constitutional Conventions in the Old Northwest. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016.
    • Stansel, Christine. City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789–1860. New York: Knopf, 1986.
    • Varon, Elizabeth R. We Mean to Be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Vaughn, William Preston. The Anti-Masonic Party in the United States: 1826–1843, paperback ed. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2009.
    • Watson, Harry. Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America, rev. ed. New York: Hill and Wang, 2006.
    • Wellman, Judith. Grassroots Reform in the Burned-Over District of Upstate New York: Religion, Abolitionism, and Democracy. New York: Routledge, 2016.
    • Wilentz, Sean. The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln. New York: Norton, 2005.

    Notes

    1. Quoted in James Parton, Life of Andrew Jackson, Vol. 1 (New York: Mason Brothers, 1860), 297.
    2. Max Farrand, ed., The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Vol. 1 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1911), 288.
    3. Ibid., 48.
    4. Benjamin Rush, “Address to the People of the United States,” in Hezekiah Niles, ed., Principles and Acts of the Revolution in America (Baltimore: William Ogden Niles, 1822), 402. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000315501.
    5. Alexander Hamilton to James A. Bayard, April 1802, Founders Online, National Archives. http://founders.archives.gov/documen.../01-25-02-0321. From The Papers of Alexander Hamilton, Vol. 25, July 1800–April 1802, ed. Harold C. Syrett (New York: Columbia University Press, 1977), 605–610
    6. A Century of Population Growth: From the First Census of the United States to the Twelfth, 1790–1900 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1909), 133, table 60. http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decenni...165897ch14.pdf.
    7. Conference committee report on the Missouri Compromise, March 1, 1820, Records of Joint Committees of Congress, 1789–1989, National Archives. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=22.
    8. Thomas Jefferson to John Holmes, April 22, 1820, Founders Online, National Archives. http://founders.archives.gov/documen.../98-01-02-1234.
    9. Robert V. Remini, The Battle of New Orleans: Andrew Jackson and America’s First Military Victory (New York: Penguin, 1999), 167–168.
    10. Kenneth Wiggins Porter, “Negroes and the Seminole War, 1817–1818,” Journal of Negro History 36, no. 3 (July 1951): 264.
    11. See Lynn Hudson Parsons, The Birth of Modern Politics: Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009).
    12. John C. Calhoun to Virgil Maxcy, September 11, 1830, quoted in William M. Meigs, The Life of John Caldwell Calhoun, Vol. 1 (New York: Stechert, 1917), 419.
    13. John C. Calhoun, “Exposition and Protest,” in Union and Liberty: The Political Philosophy of John C. Calhoun, ed. Ross M. Lence (Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund, 1992), 311–365. http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/683.
    14. Thomas Hart Benton, Thirty Years’ View: Or, a History of the Working of the American Government for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850, Vol. 1 (New York: Appleton, 1854), 148. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/000405607.
    15. South Carolina ordinance of nullification, November 24, 1832, Avalon Project, Yale Law School. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/ordnull.asp.
    16. Andrew Jackson, proclamation regarding nullification, December 10, 1832, Avalon Project, Yale Law School. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/jack01.asp
    17. Catherine Allgor, Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000), 200.
    18. Elizabeth R. Varon, We Mean to Be Counted: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998).
    19. Margaret Bayard Smith to Margaret Bayard Boyd, December 20 [?], 1828, Margaret Bayard Smith Papers, quoted in ibid., 215.
    20. Andrew Jackson to John Christmas McLemore, April [26], 1829, in The Papers of Andrew Jackson, eds. Daniel Feller, Harold D. Moser, Laura-Eve Moss, and Thomas Coens, Vol. 7 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2007), 184; John F. Marszalek, The Petticoat Affair: Manners, Mutiny, and Sex in Andrew Jackson’s White House(Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1997), 64.
    21. Andrew Jackson to John McLemore, November 24, 1829, quoted in Richard E. Ellis, The Union at Risk: Jacksonian Democracy, States’ Rights and the Nullification Crisis (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), 61
    22. Michel Chevalier and Andrew Jackson, quoted in Andrew Burstein, The Passions of Andrew Jackson (New York: Knopf, 2003), 200.
    23. Andrew Jackson, veto message regarding the Bank of the United States, July 10, 1832, Avalon Project, Yale Law School. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/ajveto01.asp.
    24. “The Philadelphia Meeting,” Niles’ Weekly Register (July 21, 1832), 375.
    25. “The Bank Veto,” National Intelligencer, August 9, 1832, in David A. Copeland, ed., The Antebellum Era: Primary Documents on Events from 1820 to 1860 (Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2003), 153
    26. Quoted in Harry Watson, Liberty and Power: The Politics of Jacksonian America, rev. ed. (New York: Hill and Wang, 2006), 151.
    27. Alasdair Roberts, America’s First Great Depression: Economic Crisis and Political Disorder after the Panic of 1837 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2012), 31, 36.
    28. Quoted in ibid., 38.
    29. “Great Public Meeting in Philadelphia,” Niles’ Weekly Register (May 27, 1837), 198
    30. Roberts, America’s First Great Depression, 23.
    31. Quoted in ibid., 21.
    32. Ibid., 53. Also see Jessica Lepler, The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013).
    33. Henry Clay to Francis Brooke, December 16, 1833, quoted in Michael F. Holt, The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 29.
    34. Joseph Nathan Kane, Presidential Fact Book (New York: Random House, 1998), 61.
    35. William Morgan, Illustrations of Masonry, by One of the Fraternity, Who Has Devoted Thirty Years to the Subject (Batavia, NY: Miller, 1826). http://archive.org/details/illustrationsofm00morg.
    36. William Preston Vaughn, The Anti-Masonic Party in the United States: 1826–1843, paperback ed. (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2009), 31.
    37. Rebecca Theresa Reed, Six Months in a Convent, or, The Narrative of Rebecca Theresa Reed (Boston: Russell, Odiorne and Metcalf, 1835. http://archive.org/details/sixmonthsinconve00reedr.
    38. [Samuel F. B. Morse], Foreign Conspiracy against the Liberties of the United States (New York: Leavitt, Lord, 1835), 16, 127. http://archive.org/details/foreignconspira00mors.
    39. Lyman Beecher, A Plea for the West, 2nd ed. (Cincinnati, OH: Truman and Smith, 1835), 54, http://archive.org/details/pleaforwest00beec.
    40. Frederick Marryat, Diary in America with Remarks on Its Institutions (London: Longman, 1839), Vol. 1, 297, quoted in Eric Ledell Smith, “The End of Black Voting Rights in Pennsylvania: African Americans and the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention of 1837–1838,” Pennsylvania History 65, no. 3 (Summer 1998): 296.
    41. Michael R. Haines, “Table Aa145-184: Population, by Sex and Race: 1790–1990,” Historical Statistics of the United States, millennial ed. online, eds. Susan B. Carter, Scott Sigmund Gartner, Michael R. Haines, Alan L. Olmstead, Richard Sutch, and Gavin Wright (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006). http://hsus.cambridge.org.
    42. Niles’ Weekly Register (August 23, 1834), 426.
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