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5.9: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9878
  • This chapter was edited by Michael Hattem, with content contributions by James Ambuske, Alexander Burns, Joshua Beatty, Christina Carrick, Christopher Consolino, Michael Hattem, Timothy C. Hemmis, Joseph Moore, Emily Romeo, and Christopher Sparshott.

    Recommended citation: James Ambuske et al., “The American Revolution,” Michael Hattem, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1967.
    • Berkin, Carol. Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America’s Independence. New York: Knopf, 20056.
    • Breen, T. H. The Marketplace of Revolution: How Consumer Politics Shaped American Independence. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.
    • Carp, Benjamin L. Rebels Rising: Cities and the American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.
    • Duvall, Kathleen. Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution. New York: Random House, 2015.
    • Egerton, Douglas R. Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.
    • Eustace, Nicole. Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
    • Fliegelman, Jay. Prodigals and Pilgrims: The American Revolution Against Patriarchal Authority 1750–1800. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1985.
    • Gould, Eliga. Among the Powers of the Earth: The American Revolution and the Making of a New World Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2012.
    • Greene, Jack P. The Constitutional Origins of the American Revolution. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
    • Holton, Woody. Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves, and the Making of the American Revolution in Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999.
    • Jasanoff, Maya. Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World. New York: Knopf, 2011.
    • Kamensky, Jane. A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley. New York: Norton, 2016.
    • Kerber, Linda K. Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980.
    • Knott, Sarah. Sensibility and the American Revolution. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.
    • Landers, Jane G. Atlantic Creoles in the Age of Revolutions. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2010.
    • Maier, Pauline. American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence. New York: Knopf, 1997.
    • ———. From Resistance to Revolution: Colonial Radicals and the Development of American Opposition to Britain, 1765–1776. New York: Vintage Books, 1974.
    • Nash, Gary B. The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America. New York: Viking, 2005.
    • Norton, Mary Beth. Liberty’s Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750–1800. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1980.
    • O’Shaughnessy, Andrew Jackson. The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2013.
    • Schiff, Stacy. A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America. New York: Thorndike Press, 2005.
    • Waldstreicher, David. Slavery’s Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification. New York: Hill and Wang, 2009.
    • Wood, Gordon S. The Radicalism of the American Revolution. New York: Vintage Books, 1992.
    • Young, Alfred F., and Gregory Nobles. Whose American Revolution Was It? Historians Interpret the Founding. New York: New York University Press, 2011.

    Notes

    1. Benjamin Rush to Ebenezer Hazard, October 22, 1768, in L. H. Butterfield, ed., Letters of Benjamin Rush, 2 vols. (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1951), vol. 1, 68.
    2. Jack P. Greene, The Constitutional Origins of the American Revolution (Cambridge, UK: New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010).
    3. James Otis, The Rights of the Colonies Asserted and Proved (Boston: Edes and Gill, 1764), 52, 38.
    4. Greene, Constitutional Origins of the American Revolution, 118.
    5. Bernard Bailyn, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1967).
    6. Jack P. Greene, Pursuits of Happiness: The Social Development of Early Modern British Colonies and the Formation of American Culture (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988), 170–171. Also see John Murrin, “Anglicizing an American Colony: The Transformation of Provincial Massachusetts,” PhD diss., Yale University, 1966.
    7. Daniel Dulany, Considerations on the Propriety of Imposing Taxes in the British Colonies, for the Purpose of Raising a Revenue, by Act of Parliament. The Second Edition (Annapolis, MD: Jonas Green, 1765), 34. For a 1766 London reprint, see https://archive.org/details/cihm_20394, accessed April 24, 2018.
    8. Newport Mercury, June 24, 1765. This version was also reprinted in newspapers in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Maryland.
    9. Proceedings of the Congress at New-York (Annapolis, MD: Jonas Green, 1766).
    10. Dulany, Considerations on the Propriety of imposing Taxes in the British Colonies, 8.
    11. “The Colonist’s Advocate: III, 11 January 1770,” Founders Online, National Archives.http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-17-02-0009, last modified June 29, 2017.
    12. George Canning, A Letter to the Right Honourable Wills Earl of Hillsborough, on the Connection Between Great Britain and Her American Colonies (London: T. Becket, 1768), 9.
    13. “New York, October 31, 1765,” New-York Gazette, or Weekly Mercury, November 7, 1765.
    14. “Resolution of Non-Importation made by the Citizens of Philadelphia,” October 25, 1765, mss., Historical Society of Pennsylvania. http://digitalhistory.hsp.org/pafrm/...ctober-25-1765. For the published notice of the resolution, see “Philadelphia, November 7, 1765,” broadside, “Pennsylvania Stamp Act and Non-Importation Resolutions Collection,” American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, PA.
    15. “The Petition of the London Merchants to the House of Commons,” in Prologue to Revolution: Sources and Documents on the Stamp Act Crisis, 1764–1766, ed. Edmund S. Morgan (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1959), 130–131.
    16. Governor Francis Bernard to Lord Halifax, August 15, 1765, in ibid., 107.
    17. For Hutchinson’s own account of the events, see Thomas Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, August 30, 1765, in The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson, Volume 1: 1740–1766, ed. John W. Tyler (Boston: Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 2014), 291–294
    18. Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New-York, procured in Holland, England, and France, 13 vols., ed. Edmund O’Callaghan (Albany, NY: Weed, Parsons, 1856), vol. 7, 770. https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Btm5M84IMAA4MCY.png:large, accessed April 24, 2018.
    19. “The Declaratory Act,” The Avalon Project: Documents in Law, History, and Diplomacy. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/declaratory_act_1766.asp, accessed April 24, 2018.
    20. “Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, to the Inhabitants of the British Colonies. Letter II,” Pennsylvania Gazette, December 10, 1767.
    21. “Address to the Ladies,” Boston Post-Boy, November 16, 1767; Boston Evening-Post, February 12, 1770. Many female contributions to political commentary took the form of poems and drama, as in the poetry of Hannah Griffitts and satirical plays by Mercy Otis Warren.
    22. Carol Berkin, Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America’s Independence (New York: Knopf, 2005), 17–18.
    23. New York Gazette, or Weekly Post-Boy, June 18, July 9, 16, 1770.
    24. Pennsylvania Chronicle, September 27, 1773. For an example of how fast news and propaganda was spreading throughout the colonies, this piece was reprinted in Massachusetts Gazette, October 4, 1773; New-Hampshire Gazette, and Historical Chronicle, October 15, 1773; and Virginia Gazette, October 21, 1773.
    25. Massachusetts Gazette, and Boston Post-Boy, November 29, 1773.
    26. Boston Gazette, December 20, 1773.
    27. Virginia Gazette, November 3, 1774; Cynthia A. Kierner, “The Edenton Ladies: Women, Tea, and Politics in Revolutionary North Carolina,” in North Carolina Women: Their Lives and Times, ed. Michele Gillespie and Sally G. McMillen (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2014), 12–33.
    28. Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor, The Ties That Buy: Women and Commerce in Revolutionary America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009), 178–184.
    29. Ray Raphael, The First American Revolution: Before Lexington and Concord (New York: New Press, 2002), 59–168.
    30. American Archives: Fourth Series Containing a Documentary History of the English Colonies in North America, ed. Peter Force (Washington, D.C.: Clarke and Force, 1837), vol. 1, 913–916. https://archive.org/stream/AmericanArchives-FourthSeriesVolume1-ContainingADocumentaryHistory/AaSeries4VolumeI#page/n455/mode/2up, accessed April 24, 2018.
    31. “From Benjamin Franklin to Jonathan Shipley, 7 July 1775,” Founders Online, National Archives. http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-22-02-0057, last modified June 29, 2017.
    32. Gt. Brit. Soveriengs, Etc., “His Majesty’s Most Gracious Speech to Both Houses of Parliament, on Friday, October 27, 1775 . . . New York? 1775].” https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.10803800/, accessed April 24, 2018.
    33. Thomas Paine, Common Sense (Philadelphia: W. T. and Bradford, 1776). https://www.gutenberg.org/files/147/147-h/147-h.htm, accessed April 24, 2018.
    34. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, 34 vols. (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1904–1937), vol. 4, 342. http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/hlaw:@field(DOCID+@lit(jc004109.
    35. “Report & the Resolution for Independancy Agreed to July 2d. 1776,” Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 23, folio 17, National Archives, Washington, DC. http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/american_originals/declarat.html.
    36. Journals of the Continental Congress 5: 510–516.
    37. For more on the process of writing the Declaration of Independence, see Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence (New York: Knopf, 1997).
    38. Barnet Schecter, The Battle for New York: The City at the Heart of the American Revolution (New York: Walker, 2002).
    39. David Hackett Fischer, Washington’s Crossing (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004).
    40. Richard M. Ketchum, Saratoga: Turning Point of America’s Revolutionary War (New York: Holt, 1997).
    41. For more on Franklin’s diplomacy in France, see Stacy Schiff, A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America (New York: Thorndike Press, 2005).
    42. David K. Wilson, The Southern Strategy: Britain’s Conquest of South Carolina and Georgia, 1775–1780 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2005).
    43. Richard M. Ketchum, Victory at Yorktown: The Campaign That Won the Revolution (New York: Holt, 2004).
    44. Woody Holton, Abigail Adams (New York: Free Press, 2009), 208–217.
    45. Joy Day Buel and Richard Buel, The Way of Duty: A Woman and Her Family in Revolutionary America (New York: Norton, 1995), 145–170.
    46. For discussion of these numerical estimates, see Gary Nash’s introduction to Benjamin Quarles, The Negro in the American Revolution (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, Press, 1996), xxiii.
    47. Willi Paul Adams, The First American Constitutions: Republican Ideology and the Making of the State Constitutions in the Revolutionary Era (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001), 126–146.
    48. Gordon S. Wood, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1969).
    49. Maya Jasanoff, Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World (New York: Knopf, 2011).
    50. Alan Gilbert, Black Patriots and Loyalists: Fighting for Emancipation in the War of Independence (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012).
    51. Ira Berlin, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998), 217–289.
    52. For a summary of the global aspects of the Revolution, see Ted Brackemyre, “The American Revolution: A Very European Ordeal,” U.S. History Scene, http://ushistoryscene.com/article/am-rev-european-ordeal, accessed April 24, 2018.
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