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12.9: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9965
  • This chapter was edited by Joshua Beatty and Gregg Lightfoot, with content contributions by Ethan Bennett, Michelle Cassidy, Jonathan Grandage, Gregg Lightfoot, Jose Juan Perez Melendez, Jessica Moore, Nick Roland, Matthew K. Saionz, Rowan Steinecker, Patrick Troester, and Ben Wright.

    Recommended citation: Ethan Bennett et al., “Manifest Destiny,” Joshua Beatty and Gregg Lightfoot, eds., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Blackhawk, Ned. Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008.
    • Brooks, James F. Captives and Cousins: Slavery, Kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.
    • Cusick, James G. The Other War of 1812: The Patriot War and the American Invasion of Spanish East Florida. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007.
    • DeLay, Brian. War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009.
    • Exley, Jo Ella Powell. Frontier Blood: The Saga of the Parker Family. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2005.
    • Gómez, Laura E. Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race. New York: New York University Press, 2008.
    • Gordon, Sarah Barringer. The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
    • Greenberg, Amy S. Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
    • Haas, Lisbeth. Conquest and Historical Identities in California, 1769–1936. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.
    • Hämäläinen, Pekka. The Comanche Empire. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008.
    • Holmes, Kenneth L. Covered Wagon Women: Diaries & Letters from the Western Trails, 1840–1849. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1995.
    • Horsman, Reginald. Race and Manifest Destiny: The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.
    • Hyde, Anne F. Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011.
    • Johnson, Susan Lee. Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush. New York: Norton, 2000.
    • Larson, John Lauritz. Internal Improvement: National Public Works and the Promise of Popular Government in the Early United States. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
    • Lazo, Rodrigo. Writing to Cuba: Filibustering and Cuban Exiles in the United States. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006.
    • May, Robert E. Manifest Destiny’s Underworld: Filibustering in Antebellum America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002.
    • Merry, Robert W. A Country of Vast Designs: James K. Polk, the Mexican War and the Conquest of the American Continent. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2009.
    • Namias, June. White Captives: Gender and Ethnicity on the American Frontier. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
    • Perdue, Theda. “Mixed Blood” Indians: Racial Construction in the Early South. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2005.
    • Peters, Virginia Pergman. Women of the Earth Lodges: Tribal Life on the Plains. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2000.
    • Peterson, Dawn. Indians in the Family: Adoption and the Politics of Antebellum Expansion. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.
    • Richter, Daniel K. Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.
    • Wilkins, David E. Hollow Justice: A History of Indigenous Claims in the United States. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2013.
    • Yarbrough, Faye. Race and the Cherokee Nation: Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008

    Notes

    1. John O’Sullivan, “Annexation,” United States Magazine and Democratic Review 17, no. 1 (July–August 1845), 5.
    2. Yonatan Eyal, The Young America Movement and the Transformation of the Democratic Party, 1828–1861 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007).
    3. Ralph Waldo Emerson, “The Young American: A Lecture Read Before the Mercantile Library Association, Boston, February 7, 1844.” http://www.emersoncentral.com/youngam.htm, accessed May 18, 2015.
    4. See Peter S. Onuf, “Imperialism and Nationalism in the Early American Republic,” in Empire’s Twin: U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism, eds. Ian Tyrell and Jay Sexton (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015), 21–40.
    5. Abraham Lincoln, “Lecture on Discoveries and Inventions: First Delivered April 6, 1858.” http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/discoveries.htm, accessed May 18, 2015.
    6. Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance During the Early Reservation (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009), 11–13.
    7. Malcolm J. Rohrbough, Trans-Appalachian Frontier, Third Edition: People, Societies, and Institutions, 1775–1850 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008), 474–479.
    8. Mark Wyman, Immigrants in the Valley: Irish, Germans, and Americans in the Upper Mississippi Country, 1830–1860 (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2016), 128, 148–149.
    9. Horace Greeley, New York Tribune, 1841. Although the phrase “Go west, young man,” is often attributed to Greeley, the exhortation was most likely only popularized by the newspaper editor in numerous speeches, letters, and editorials and always in the larger context of the comparable and superior health, wealth, and advantages to be had in the West.
    10. Robert V. Remini, Andrew Jackson: The Course of American Empire, 1767–1821 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977), 344–355.
    11. Francis Newton Thorpe, ed., The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the States, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America Compiled and Edited Under the Act of Congress of June 30, 1906 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1909.
    12. Thomas Sidney Jesup, quoted in Kenneth Wiggins Porter, “Negroes and the Seminole War, 1835–1842,” Journal of Southern History 30, no. 4 (November 1964): 427.
    13. “President Andrew Jackson’s Message to Congress ‘On Indian Removal’ (1830).” http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=25&page=transcript, accessed May 26, 2015.
    14. Ibid.
    15. Tim A. Garrison, “Worcester v. Georgia (1832),” New Georgia Encyclopedia. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/a...v-georgia-1832.
    16. Fay A. Yarbrough, Race and the Cherokee Nation: Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008), 15–21.
    17. John Ross, quoted in Brian Hicks, Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees, and the Trail of Tears (New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 2011), 210.
    18. Russell Thornton, The Cherokees: A Population History (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1990), 76.
    19. Senate Document #512, 23 Cong., 1 Sess. Vol. IV, p. x. https://books.google.com/books?id=KSTlvxxCOkcC&dq=60,000+removal+indian&source=gbs_navlinks_s.
    20. John P. Bowes, Land Too Good for Indians: Northern Indian Removal (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2016).
    21. Pekka Hämäläinen, The Comanche Empire (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008).
    22. Samuel J. Wells, “Federal Indian Policy: From Accommodation to Removal,” in Carolyn Reeves, ed., The Choctaw Before Removal (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1985), 181–211.
    23. William C. Sturtevant, Handbook of North American Indians: History of Indian-White Relations, Vol. 4 (Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1988), 289.
    24. Adrienne Caughfield, True Women and Westward Expansion (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2005).
    25. Murray Newton Rothbard, Panic of 1819: Reactions and Policies (New York: Columbia University Press, 1962).
    26. Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, 1817–1862 (New York: Hill and Wang, 1996).
    27. For more on the technology and transportation revolutions, see Daniel Walker Howe, What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815–1848 (Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2007)..
    28. David Reimers, Other Immigrants: The Global Origins of the American People (New York: New York University Press, 2005), 27.
    29. H. P. N. Gammel, ed., The Laws of Texas, 1822–1897, Vol. 1 (Austin, TX: Gammel, 1898), 1063. https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth5872/m1/1071/.
    30. Randolph B. Campbell, An Empire for Slavery: The Peculiar Institution in Texas, 1821–1865 (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1989).
    31. Quoted in The Annual Register, or, a View of the History and Politics of the Year 1846, Volume 88 (Washington, DC: Rivington, 1847), 377.
    32. James K. Polk, “President Polk’s Mexican War Message,” quoted in The Statesmen’s Manual: The Addresses and Messages of the Presidents of the United States, Inaugural, Annual, and Special, from 1789 to 1846: With a Memoir of Each of the Presidents and a History of Their Administrations; Also the Constitution of the United States, and a Selection of Important Documents and Statistical Information, Vol. 2 (New York: Walker, 1847), 1489.
    33. Amy S. Greenberg, Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2005).
    34. James M. McCaffrey, Army of Manifest Destiny: The American Soldier in the Mexican War, 1846–1848 (New York: New York University Press, 1992), 53.
    35. Ralph Waldo Emerson, quoted in James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), 51.
    36. Susan Lee Johnson, Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush (New York: Norton, 2000).
    37. John Quincy Adams, “Mr. Adams Oration, July 21, 1821,” quoted in Niles’ Weekly Register 20, (Baltimore: H. Niles, 1821), 332.
    38. Gretchen Murphy, Hemispheric Imaginings: The Monroe Doctrine and Narratives of U.S. Empire (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2009).
    39. Tom Chaffin, Fatal Glory: Narciso López and the First Clandestine U.S. War Against Cuba (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1996).
    40. Anne F. Hyde, Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011), 471.
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