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7.4: Public Domain

  • Page ID
    244297
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    Public domain refers to creative works that are not protected by intellectual property laws, such as copyright, and are therefore free for anyone to use without permission or payment. These works can include literature, music, art, and scientific discoveries that are considered part of the public heritage. Once a work enters the public domain, it can be freely accessed, shared, and built upon by anyone. Works in the public domain play a crucial role in education, research, and creativity by providing a foundation of knowledge and inspiration for new creations. 

    Isn't that just CC0?  

    Basically, yes! CC0 is a license option that enables people to willingly put their works in the public domain.

    Copyright laws vary by country. In the United States, works primarily end up in the public domain when either its author releases all copyright claims to it (such as with CC0 or with government authors), or when the copyright for the work expires. For many works, it can take 70-95 years from the date of publication for the work to go into the public domain. However, the exact length of time varies greatly depending on when the work was published, who it was published by, and where it was published.1

    Sources

    1. Copyright services: Copyright term and the public domain. (2024, January 16). Cornell University Library. https://guides.library.cornell.edu/copyright/publicdomain(opens in new window)

    7.4: Public Domain is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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