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Classroom Activity: Think, Pair, Share for Academic Reading and Diverse Thinking

  • Page ID
    231384
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    What should an academic thinker ask about the perspective that they bring to reading this text? Here are some questions for you to think through individually and share with a partner and the class before you read.

    Directions: Answer the following questions on your own. With a partner, discuss your answers. If your partner has an answer that feels like it should go deeper, ask more questions, like the following: “Could you be more specific?” “Is there a specific experience or memory that you have that led you to know this, think this, or feel this?” “Why?” “Why not?” When you and your partner have finished discussing, the class should treat the first question like a brainstorm to be sure that you all have a solid idea of what you already know about the traditional story “The Three Little Pigs.” Your teacher can ask two or three groups to share what they discussed for the answers to each of the rest of the questions.

    ·        What is the story that I already know?

    ·        How do I feel about that story? How do I feel about the characters in that story?

    ·        How do I feel about the suggestion that the story I know is wrong? Do I trust that it could be wrong, or do I dismiss that suggestion out-of-hand? Why do I take either of these positions?

    ·        Do I have any feelings about this book’s narrator? What have I learned in the past about him? What have I learned in the past about others like him (wolf stereotypes)? Do those things shape what I feel about the narrator? Does examining what I have learned change how I feel about the narrator?

    ·        What are my feelings about the trustworthiness of newspapers? What are my feelings about the trustworthiness of newspaper interviews? What in my experience and education has shaped those feelings? How do all these things shape my perception of the story that I am going to read?

    As you share your answers to these questions, discuss the following: What differences are there in how you all are likely to approach reading and interpreting this book? What different experiences have led you to having different approaches?

     

     

    Class Discussion

    ·        What are some ideas, issues, discussions that you have encountered recently that come from groups who do not traditionally have power?

    ·        Have you always been comfortable with these perspectives, or have they given you discomfort?

    ·        Where do you think your comfort or discomfort come from?

    The origins of our comfort or discomfort with different ideas are always worth exploring. I tell my students that if they leave college never having asked themselves why they believe what they believe and why they think what they think, then they have done college wrong. They never have to change what they believe or think, but they should know how and why those beliefs and thoughts came to be theirs. This knowledge might help them recognize how other people’s differing beliefs and thoughts came to be, as well. In academic reading and thinking, this recognition is valuable.


    Classroom Activity: Think, Pair, Share for Academic Reading and Diverse Thinking is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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