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6.1: Writing Body Paragraphs

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    4545
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    Skills to Develop

    • Select primary support related to your thesis
    • Support your topic sentences

    Once you have completed your formal sentence outline, you will need to expand on that framework to create your expository essay. As much as you may be wanting to just get your ideas down and submit your paper, in order to make sure you are submitting a well-developed and strong essay, you need to make sure you are providing strong supporting ideas, developing paragraphs so they will fit together logically to best convince your reader, creating a strong introduction and conclusion, and revising your paper to catch issues you may have missed or not been aware of when writing.In this chapter, we will look at putting the pieces together to form a complete, revised, and supported expository essay, which you will need to submit next week.

    If your thesis gives the reader a road map to your essay, then body paragraphs should closely follow that map. The reader should be able to predict what follows your introductory paragraph by simply reading the thesis statement.

    The body paragraphs present the evidence you have gathered to confirm your thesis. Before you begin to support your thesis in the body, you must find information from a variety of sources that support and give credit to what you are trying to prove.

    Select Primary Support for Your Thesis

    Without primary support, your argument is not likely to be convincing. Primary support can be described as the major points you choose to expand on your thesis. It is the most important information you select to argue for your point of view. Each point you choose will be incorporated into the topic sentence for each body paragraph you write. Your primary supporting points are further supported by supporting details within the paragraphs.

    Tip

    Remember that a worthy argument is backed by examples. In order to construct a valid argument, good writers conduct a lot of background research and take careful notes. They also talk to people knowledgeable about a topic in order to understand its implications before writing about it.

    Identify the Characteristics of Good Primary Support

    In order to fulfill the requirements of good primary support, the information you choose must meet the following standards:

    Be specific. The main points you make about your thesis and the examples you use to expand on those points need to be specific. Use specific examples to provide the evidence and to build upon your general ideas. These types of examples give your reader something narrow to focus on, and if used properly, they leave little doubt about your claim. General examples, while they convey the necessary information, are not nearly as compelling or useful in writing because they are too obvious and typical.

    Be relevant to the thesis. Primary support is considered strong when it relates directly to the thesis. Primary support should show, explain, or prove your main argument without delving into irrelevant details. When faced with a lot of information that could be used to prove your thesis, you may think you need to include it all in your body paragraphs. But effective writers resist the temptation to lose focus. Choose your examples wisely by making sure they directly connect to your thesis.

    Be detailed. Remember that your thesis, while specific, should not be very detailed. The body paragraphs are where you develop the discussion that a thorough essay requires. Using detailed support shows readers that you have considered all the facts and chosen only the most precise details to enhance your point of view.

    Prewrite to Identify Primary Supporting Points for a Thesis Statement

    Recall that when you prewrite you essentially make a list of examples or reasons why you support your stance. Stemming from each point, you further provide details to support those reasons. After prewriting, you are then able to look back at the information and choose the most compelling pieces you will use in your body paragraphs.

    Select the Most Effective Primary Supporting Points for a Thesis Statement

    After you have prewritten about your working thesis statement, you may have generated a lot of information, which may be edited out later. Remember that your primary support must be relevant to your thesis. Remind yourself of your main argument, and delete any ideas that do not directly relate to it. Omitting unrelated ideas ensures that you will use only the most convincing information in your body paragraphs. Choose at least three of the most compelling points. These will serve as the topic sentences for your body paragraphs.

    When you support your thesis, you are revealing evidence. Evidence includes anything that can help support your stance. The following are the kinds of evidence you will encounter as you conduct your research:

    Facts: Facts are the best kind of evidence to use because they often cannot be disputed. They can support your stance by providing background information on or a solid foundation for your point of view. However, some facts may still need explanation. For example, the sentence “The most populated province in Canada is Ontario” is a pure fact, but it may require some explanation to make it relevant to your specific argument.

    Judgments: Judgments are conclusions drawn from the given facts. Judgments are more credible than opinions because they are founded upon careful reasoning and examination of a topic.

    Testimony: Testimony consists of direct quotations from either an eyewitness or an expert witness. An eyewitness is someone who has direct experience with a subject; the witness adds authenticity to an argument based on facts. An expert witness is a person who has extensive experience with a topic. This person studies the facts and provides commentary based on either facts or judgments, or both. An expert witness adds authority and credibility to an argument.

    Personal observation: Personal observation is similar to testimony, but personal observation consists of your testimony. It reflects what you know to be true because you have experiences and have formed either opinions or judgments about them. For instance, if you are one of five children and your thesis states that being part of a large family is beneficial to a child’s social development, you could use your own experience to support your thesis.

    Writing at Work

    In any job where you devise a plan, you will need to support the steps that you lay out. This is an area in which you would incorporate primary support into your writing. Choosing only the most specific and relevant information to expand upon the steps will ensure that your plan appears well thought out and precise.

    Tip

    You can consult a vast pool of resources to gather support for your stance. Citing relevant information from reliable sources ensures that your reader will take you seriously and consider your assertions. Use any of the following sources for your essay: newspapers or news organization websites, magazines, encyclopedias, and scholarly journals, which are periodicals that address topics in a specialized field.

    Choose Supporting Topic Sentences

    Each body paragraph contains a topic sentence that states one aspect of your thesis and then expands upon it. Like the thesis statement, each topic sentence should be specific and supported by concrete details, facts, or explanations.

    Each body paragraph should comprise the following elements.

    topic sentence + supporting details (examples, reasons, or arguments)

    As you read in Chapter 5, topic sentences indicate the location and main points of the basic arguments of your essay. These sentences are vital to writing your body paragraphs because they always refer back to and support your thesis statement. Topic sentences are linked to the ideas you have introduced in your thesis, thus reminding readers what your essay is about. A paragraph without a clearly identified topic sentence may be unclear and scattered, just like an essay without a thesis statement.

    Tip

    Unless your teacher instructs otherwise, you should include at least three body paragraphs in your essay. A five-paragraph/section essay, including the introduction and conclusion, is commonly the standard for exams and essay assignments.

    Consider the following the thesis statement:

    ch6_1-e1439228646965.png

    The following topic sentence is a primary support point for the thesis. The topic sentence states exactly what the controlling idea of the paragraph is. Later, you will see the writer immediately provide support for the sentence.

    chap6_2-e1439228700989.png

    Exercise 6.1

    In Exercise 5.9, you chose three of your most convincing points to support the thesis statement you wrote. Now we are going to build onto the formal sentence outline you constructed in Exercise 5.14Take each point and incorporate it into a topic sentence for each body paragraph.

    Supporting point 1: ____________________________________________

    Topic sentence: _______________________________________________________________________________

    Supporting point 2: ____________________________________________

    Topic sentence: _______________________________________________________________________________

    Supporting point 3: ____________________________________________

    Topic sentence: _______________________________________________________________________________

    CollaborationPlease share with a classmate and compare your answers.

    Draft Supporting Detail Sentences for Each Primary Support Sentence

    After deciding which primary support points you will use as your topic sentences, you must add details to clarify and demonstrate each of those points. These supporting details provide examples, facts, or evidence that support the topic sentence.

    The writer drafts possible supporting detail sentences for each primary support sentence based on the thesis statement:

     chap6_3-e1439228981764.png

    The following paragraph contains supporting detail sentences for the primary support sentence (the topic sentence), which is underlined.

    chap6_4-e1439229182221.png

    Exercise 6.2

    Using the three topic sentences you composed for the thesis statement in Exercise 6.1,draft at least three supporting details for each point.

    Thesis statement: _____________________________________________________________________________

    Primary supporting point 1: _____________________________________________________________________

    Supporting details: ____________________________________________________________________________

    Primary supporting point 2: _____________________________________________________________________

    Supporting details: ____________________________________________________________________________

    Primary supporting point 3: _____________________________________________________________________

    Supporting details: ____________________________________________________________________________

    Tip

    You have the option of writing your topic sentences in one of three ways. You can state it at the beginning of the body paragraph, or at the end of the paragraph, or you do not have to write it at all. One that is not written at all is called an implied topic sentence. An implied topic sentence lets readers form the main idea for themselves. For beginning writers, it is best to not use implied topic sentences because it makes it harder to focus your writing. Your instructor may also want to clearly identify the sentences that support your thesis.

    Tip

    Print out the first draft of your essay and use a highlighter to mark your topic sentences in the body paragraphs. Make sure they are clearly stated and accurately present your paragraphs, as well as accurately reflect your thesis. If your topic sentence contains information that does not exist in the rest of the paragraph, rewrite it to more accurately match the rest of the paragraph.

    key takeaways

    • Your body paragraphs should closely follow the path set forth by your thesis statement.
    • Strong body paragraphs contain evidence that supports your thesis.
    • Primary support comprises the most important points you use to support your thesis.
    • Strong primary support is specific, detailed, and relevant to the thesis.
    • Prewriting helps you determine your most compelling primary support.
    • Evidence includes facts, judgments, testimony, and personal observation.
    • Reliable sources may include newspapers, magazines, academic journals, books, encyclopedias, and firsthand testimony.
    • A topic sentence presents one point of your thesis statement while the information in the rest of the paragraph supports that point.
    • A body paragraph comprises a topic sentence plus supporting details.
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