Skip to main content
Humanities Libertexts

1.2: Developing Study Skills (Part 2)

  • Page ID
    4513
  • [ "article:topic" ]

    Writing at Work

    If you are part of the workforce, you have probably established strategies for accomplishing job-related tasks efficiently. How could you adapt these strategies to help you be a successful student? For instance, you might sync your school and work schedules on an electronic calendar. Instead of checking in with your boss about upcoming work deadlines, establish a buddy system where you check in with a friend about school projects. Give school the same priority you give to work.

    Note-Taking Methods

    One final valuable tool to have in your arsenal as a student is a good note-taking system. Just the act of converting a spoken lecture to notes helps you organize and retain information, and of course, good notes also help you review important concepts later. Although taking good notes is an essential study skill, many students have never received guidance on note taking.

    Marking, note making, or note taking is a matter of personal preference in terms of style. The most important thing is to do something. Again we stress that reading is like a dialogue with an author. The author wrote this material. Pretend you are actually talking to the author.

    • Do not let an idea pass without noting it.
    • Do not let an ambiguity go by without questioning it.
    • Do not let a term slip away if context does not help you understand it; look it up!
    • Engage and you will both understand and remember.

    Tip

    Put small checks in pencil where you would normally underline. When you finish a section, look back and see what you really need to mark. (If you check over 50 percent of the page, you probably are marking to go back and learn later versus thinking about what is really important to learn now!)

    Use consistent symbols to visually help you identify what is happening on the page:

    • Circle central themes or write at the beginning of the section if it is not directly stated.
    • [Bracket] main points.
    • Underline key words or phrases for significant details.
    • Put numbers 1, 2, 3 for items listed.
    • Put square brackets or highlights for key terms when the definition follows.
    • Use stars (*), question marks (?), or diagrams in the margins to show relevance.
    • Use key word outlines in the margins for highlighting.
    • Write questions in the margin that test your memory of what is written right there.
    • Use blank spaces indicating the number of ideas to be remembered, forcing you to test yourself versus just rereading.

    The following sections discuss different strategies you can use to take notes efficiently. No matter which system you choose, keep these general note-taking guidelines in mind.

    General Note-Taking Guidelines

    Before class, quickly review your notes from the previous class and the assigned reading. Fixing key terms and concepts in your mind will help you stay focused and pick out the important points during the lecture.

    Come prepared with paper, pens, highlighters, textbooks, and any important handouts.

    Come to class with a positive attitude and a readiness to learn. During class, make a point of concentrating. Ask questions if you need to. Be an active participant.

    During class, capture important ideas as concisely as you can. Use words or phrases instead of full sentences, and abbreviate when possible.

    Visually organize your notes into main topics, subtopics, and supporting points, and show the relationships between ideas. Leave space if necessary so you can add more details under important topics or subtopics.

    Record the following:

    Ideas that the instructor repeats frequently or points out as key ideas

    Ideas the instructor lists on a whiteboard or transparency

    Details, facts, explanations, and lists that develop main points

    Review your notes regularly throughout the semester, not just before exams.

    Organizing Ideas in Your Notes

    A good note-taking system needs to help you differentiate among major points, related subtopics, and supporting details. It visually represents the connections between ideas. Finally, to be effective, your note-taking system must allow you to record and organize information fairly quickly. Although some students like to create detailed, formal outlines or concept maps when they read, these may not be good strategies for class notes because spoken lectures may not allow time for to create them.

    Instead, focus on recording content simply and quickly to create organized, legible notes. Try one of the following techniques.

    Modified Outline Format

    A modified outline format uses indented spacing to show the hierarchy of ideas without including roman numerals, lettering, and so forth. Just use a dash or bullet to signify each new point unless your instructor specifically presents a numbered list of items.

    The first example shows Crystal’s notes from a developmental psychology class about an important theorist in this field. Notice how the line for the main topic is all the way to the left. Subtopics are indented, and supporting details are indented one level further. Crystal also used abbreviations for terms like development and example.

    Mind Mapping/Clustering

    If you are a visual learner, you may prefer to use a more graphic format for notes, such as a mind map. The next example shows how Crystal’s lecture notes could be set up differently. Although the format is different, the content and organization are the same.

    mind-mapping-e1437516362274.png

    Charting

    If the content of a lecture falls into a predictable, well organized pattern, you might choose to use a chart or table to record your notes. This system works best when you already know, either before class or at the beginning of class, which categories you should include. The next figure shows how this system might be used.

    charting-e1437516422130.png

    The Cornell Note-Taking System

    In addition to the general techniques already described, you might find it useful to practise a specific strategy known as the Cornell note-taking system. This popular format makes it easy not only to organize information clearly but also to note key terms and summarize content.

    To use the Cornell system, begin by setting up the page with these components:

    • The course name and lecture date at the top of the page
    • A narrow column (about two inches) at the left side of the page
    • A wide column (about five to six inches) on the right side of the page
    • A space of a few lines marked off at the bottom of the page

    During the lecture, you record notes in the wide column. You can do so using the traditional modified outline format or a more visual format if you prefer.

    Then, as soon as possible after the lecture, review your notes and identify key terms. Jot these down in the narrow left-hand column. You can use this column as a study aid by covering the notes on the right-hand side, reviewing the key terms, and trying to recall as much as you can about them so that you can mentally restate the main points of the lecture. Uncover the notes on the right to check your understanding. Finally, use the space at the bottom of the page to summarize each page of notes in a few sentences.

    The next figure shows what Crystal’s notes would look like using the Cornell system.

    cornell-e1437516504158.png

    Writing at Work

    Often, at school or in the workplace, a speaker will provide you with pre-generated notes summarizing electronic presentation slides. You may be tempted not to take notes at all because much of the content is already summarized for you. However, it is a good idea to jot down at least a few notes. Doing so keeps you focused during the presentation, allows you to record details you might otherwise forget, and gives you the opportunity to jot down questions or reflections to personalize the content.

    Exercise 1.5

    Over the next few weeks, establish a notetaking system that works for you.

    If you are not already doing so, try using one of the aforementioned techniques. (Remember that the Cornell system can be combined with other note-taking formats.)

    It can take some trial and error to find a note-taking system that works for you. If you find that you are struggling to keep up with lectures, consider whether you need to switch to a different format or be more careful about distinguishing key concepts from unimportant details.

    If you find that you are having trouble taking notes effectively, set up an appointment with your school’s academic resource centre.

    key takeaways

    • Understanding your individual learning style and preferences can help you identify the study and time management strategies that will work best for you.
    • To manage your time effectively, it is important to look both at the short term (daily and weekly schedules) and the long term (major semester deadlines).
    • To manage your time effectively, be consistent about maintaining your schedule. If your schedule is not working for you, make adjustments.
    • Was this article helpful?