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Humanities Libertexts

Book: Horse of a Different Color - English Composition & Rhetoric

  • Page ID
    4890
  • In its premier edition, Horse of a Different Color: Composition and English Rhetoric is a textbook for English 101 students and faculty grown out of the belief that high-quality textbooks should be affordable and functional, providing materials that teach strong academic writing skills in a supportive, creative, and conversational manner that appeals to students and faculty. Considering the rising costs of textbooks coupled with the need for materials that match the course objectives and learning outcomes set by the Maricopa Community College District (MCCD), the English Instructional Council (EIC), and the Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC) English division, Horse of a Different Color: Composition and English Rhetoric has been written and designed to deliver academic writing basics in printed form to all faculty and students at a cost in line with MCCD’s Maricopa Millions Project.

    The text includes writing processes, “Rhetorical Strategies” descriptions and techniques, professional models, and actual PVCC student sample essays for use in the classroom. Questions following all readings and chapter material demonstrate the key concepts of each rhetorical strategy. All Modern Language Association (MLA) rules are current, as the material has been updated to reflect the changes in MLA Handbook, Eighth Edition, published in spring 2016. The “Grammar and Mechanics” section seeks to cover the most common areas concerning student writing with practice exercises. In addition, since PVCC college faculty composed the sections and/or accessed free materials through creative commons websites (with royalties paid to some professional authors or copyright holders of our “Sample Professional Essays” selections), Horse of a Different Color: Composition and English Rhetoric has the ability to be revised with feedback from its users.

    Thumbnail: Alphabetic writing is a frequent category in human communication. Image used with permission (CC BY-SA 4.0; Petar Milošević).

    Credits

    Material has been adapted from the Community College Consortium’s Rhetoric and Composition open resource textbook.

    Images used with permission from contributors at VisualHunt.com.

    The rights holders of the following publications have granted permission to reproduce the material contained herein, for educational use, with all rights reserved.

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