Skip to main content
Humanities Libertexts

9: The Beginning of Colonization (1550 CE – 1750 CE)

  • Page ID
    56314
  • The beginning of Colonization was dominated by the superpowers in Europe, changing the world and local culture forever, decimating indigenous populations. The stylistic, complex art of the Baroque and Rococo period was a depiction of the broader cultural and intellectual divides in Europe. Although the art methods of the Baroque and Rococo may have traveled to other continents through imperialism, it is not always apparent in the art produced in other countries. Art outside of Europe was thriving in Asia, North America, Japan, and Africa in other forms with a different look and feel than the Baroque art in Europe; art designed to fit the culture and materials of the country where the artist resided. This chapter, The Beginning of Colonization, is divided into the Baroque/Rococo Art periods in Europe, the influence colonization had in Mexico, and the art other parts of the world painted, sculpted, or built.

    • 9.1: Overview
      The beginning of colonization was dominated by the superpowers in Europe, changing the world and local culture forever, decimating indigenous populations. The stylistic, intricate art of the Baroque and Rococo periods was a depiction of the broader cultural and intellectual divides in Europe.
    • 9.2: Northern European Baroque (1580s– early 1700)
      Contrasting the artists in Catholic countries, the Baroque artists in Protestant areas painted in the realism manner, artists, created still life and nature-related paintings. A greater realism or naturalistic composition evolved, leading to a new form of classicalism adopted from ancient Greek and Roman art.
    • 9.3: Italian Baroque (1580s– early 1700)
      Italy pioneered the Baroque period when the artists combined the great painting style of the renaissance with the emotional drama of the Mannerism period. Italy was the center of art for over two centuries, and the Baroque period was no exception as it spread throughout Europe.
    • 9.4: Spanish Baroque (1580s– early 1700)
      Spanish Baroque ushered in visual realism similar to the rest of Europe with fluid brushstrokes and no visible outlines, often somber or gloomy. Spain had fought and lost wars with the Netherlands and England, draining their finances.
    • 9.5: Mexican Baroque (1640 – mid 1700s)
      The Mexican Baroque period found its way to Mexico with the Spanish immigrants, and in concert with the indigenous artists, architecture, sculpting, and painting flourished.
    • 9.6: Rococo (1730 – 1760)
      The Rococo period followed the late Baroque period in Europe, a movement with an agile approach and playful themes, the brilliant and light pastel colors a stark contrast to the darker Baroque paintings.
    • 9.7: Benin Kingdom (1100 – 1897)
      Benin art is from the Kingdom of Benin, art, including cutting-edge creations of bronze work, carved ivory, and wood, demonstrating their advanced achievements.
    • 9.8: Mughal Period (1526 – 1857)
      The Mughal Empire extended far and wide throughout much of the Indian-subcontinent, and during the golden age, art flourished.
    • 9.9: Kano School (Late 15th century – 1868)
      According to Japanese history, the Kano Art School was the most influential school of painting experiencing the longest tenure.
    • 9.10: Qing Period (1636 – 1911)
      The Qing Dynasty was the last of the great imperial reigns in China, lasting almost 300 years, growing its territory and increasing the population from 150 million to over 450 million with an integrated economic structure.
    • 9.11: Conclusion and Contrast
    • 9.12: Chapter 9 Attributions

    • Was this article helpful?