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2.1.1: Contributing to the Conversation

  • Page ID
    242012
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    Conversation icon showing two speech bubbles with writing

    As a college student, whenever you complete an academic assignment, be it a research paper, a speech, or any other assignment in which you gather and synthesize information on a topic, you are participating in what is called a scholarly conversation. The term scholarly conversation describes the existing body of knowledge about a topic. This body of knowledge may include published books, presentations, research articles, conferences, discussions, online resources, and more. Your assignments are a way to add your own voice to the scholarly conversation—by reviewing what research has been done, drawing connections and conclusions from published information, and adding your own experiences, opinions, and ideas about what previous research has shown.


    Sources

    Image: “Speech Bubble” by Freepik, adapted by Aloha Sargent, from Flaticon.com


    This page titled 2.1.1: Contributing to the Conversation is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Daniel Wilson via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.