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12.2.2: Communications Unit

  • Page ID
    23409
  • Communications Unit 
    Wrap Up and Review
    Nov. 17, 2014

    Learning Objectives

    • Collect homework
    • Discuss Thanksgiving Wednesday

    • Review Quizzes

    • Unit Test Preparation

    Quiz Feedback 

    • HIGH = 28/25

    • LOW = 17/25

    • A few errors caused by NOT reading closely

    • Most short essay responses appropriate

      • Some needed more specific examples. Support ideas with specific, concrete evidence or examples.

    Communication Unit Test: Reading Concepts 

    • Annotation
    • Main idea

    • Supporting idea

    • Supporting evidence 

      • Facts

      • Statistics

      • Descriptive details

      • Research studies

      • Quotes from experts or those with firsthand experience (credible sources)

    • Denotation

    • Connotation

    • Author’s Tone

    • Metaphor

    • Simile

    • Personification

    Communication Unit Test: Content

    • Review errors in Com Quiz
    • Models of communication

    • Value of studying communications

    • KEY FOCUS: nonverbal communication

    • Nonverbal Communication

      • Review your articles and slides to refresh background knowledge (homework article will be provided back to you; it was close reading practice)

      • New reading excerpts/selection selections will be given to you on test to apply your knowledge and comprehension of nonverbal communication

    READ:  “Preparing Students for the Workplace via Body Language;” 

    REVIEW: The following slides and article above.

    STUDY SO YOU CAN APPLY: Practical tips for understanding and using body language in communications 

    PRACTICAL NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION:  BE PREPARED TO OFFER ADVICE THAT CAN APPLY TO REAL WORLD SCENARIOS

    HOW TO READ PEOPLE. By: Harris, Janelle, Essence, 00140880, Aug2014, Vol. 45, Issue 4.

    • POSTURE NEVER LIES. "We lean toward things we like and away from things we don't," says Janine Driver, author of You Say More Than You Think (Crown). So if your manager is sitting up and leaning in your direction, she's interested in hearing more of what you have to say. If she leans back during the course of a conversation -- especially a critical one -- she's creating distance, which could signal a problem. Driver suggests turning the interaction around by saying, "Maybe I'm wrong here, but it seems I made you uncomfortable bringing that up." It's a cordial, disarming style of confronting the situation, she says, and clarifies the reason for the shift in mood.

    • THE FACTS ARE IN THE FACE. Vital signs to pay attention to are in every part of the face, says Glass. "If somebody's biting her lip, she's holding back and not giving you the whole story," she says. "You may want to probe and ask more questions." Another tip-off is if a coworker tells you something while scratching her face. People sometimes involuntarily itch when they tell lies, Glass points out. Much can be learned from watching the way someone holds his or her mouth, says Patti Wood, a media coach and body language authority. For example, pursing or licking the lips can indicate anxiety, while pulling them in could suggest someone is holding back anger.

    • FEET TELL NO TALES. When people -- supervisors, associates, clients -- are engaged, their feet will point toward you. "Where the toes point, the heart follows," says Wood. "Women in particular tend to align our feet, our torso, our heart and our upper body when we're into what's being said." If they don't care about or begin to question what you're saying, they may gradually shift their body in a different direction. "One foot might turn away, then the next foot, then the lower pelvis, then the torso, then the heart center will turn away," adds Wood. When this happens, you may want to put off an important powwow for another day.

    • WATCH YOUR BODY LANGUAGE

    • YOUR EXPRESSIONS AND STANCES SPEAK VOLUMES.

    • SOME TIPS:

      • Point your feet toward the person you want to connect with.

      • Keep hands open to show approachability.

      • Maintain good, consistent eye contact (but don't stare).

      • Avoid crossing the arms -- it subconsciously creates barriers.

      • Leaning away implies disinterest. Lean in!

    NEXT  . . . 

    • UNIT TEST ON WEDNESDAY – COME PREPARED!

    • BEGIN MINI-BUSINESS UNIT MONDAY.

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