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4.4: Breaking, Combining, or Beginning New Paragraphs

  • Page ID
    20049
  • Paragraph Flow

    Like sentence length, paragraph length varies. There is no single ideal length for “the perfect paragraph.”  There are some general guidelines, however. Some writing handbooks or resources suggest that a paragraph should be at least three or four sentences; others suggest that 100 to 200 words is a good target to shoot for. In academic writing, paragraphs tend to be longer, while in less formal or less complex writing, such as in a newspaper, paragraphs tend to be much shorter. Two-thirds to three-fourths of a page is usually a good target length for paragraphs at your current level of college writing. If your readers can’t see a paragraph break on the page, they might wonder if the paragraph is ever going to end or they might lose interest.

    The most important thing to keep in mind here is that the amount of space needed to develop one idea will likely be different than the amount of space needed to develop another. So when is a paragraph complete? The answer is, when it’s fully developed. The guidelines above for providing good support should help.

    Some signals that it’s time to end a paragraph and start a new one include that

    • You’re ready to begin developing a new idea
    • You want to emphasize a point by setting it apart
    • You’re getting ready to continue discussing the same idea but in a different way (e.g. shifting from comparison to contrast)
    • You notice that your current paragraph is getting too long (more than three-fourths of a page or so), and you think your writers will need a visual break

    Some signals that you may want to combine paragraphs include that

    • You notice that some of your paragraphs appear to be short and choppy
    • You have multiple paragraphs on the same topic
    • You have undeveloped material that needs to be united under a clear topic

    Finally, paragraph number is a lot like paragraph length. You may have been asked in the past to write a five-paragraph essay. There’s nothing inherently wrong with a five-paragraph essay, but just like sentence length and paragraph length, the number of paragraphs in an essay depends upon what’s needed to get the job done. There’s really no way to know that until you start writing. So try not to worry too much about the proper length and number of things. Just start writing and see where the essay and the paragraphs take you. There will be plenty of time to sort out the organization in the revision process. You’re not trying to fit pegs into holes here. You’re letting your ideas unfold. Give yourself—and them—the space to let that happen.

     

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