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Humanities LibreTexts

Learning Objectives

  • Page ID
    36014
  • At the conclusion of this book, readers will be able to:

    • understand basic, fundamental concepts, theories, and methods of reasoning from general ethics
    • apply these ethical concepts to specific moral issues concerning animals;
    • demonstrate stronger general skills in analyzing logic, critical thinking, and moral argument analysis;
    • identify and evaluate arguments defending or opposing particular uses of animals, and theoretical claims about our obligations toward animals;
    • understand the most influential moral arguments and positions given in defense of animals and for greater animal protection, these arguments’ similarities and differences, the most common and influential objections that are raised against them, and how these arguments’ advocates respond in defense of their positions;
    • understand the most influential moral arguments and positions given in defense of animal use and against increased animal protection, these arguments’ differences, the most common and influential objections that are raised against them and how these arguments’ advocates might respond in defense of their positions;
    • understand and be able to evaluate claims about the morally-relevant empirical information needed to make informed moral judgments on ethics and animals issues;
    • understand what implications the various theories of ethics have for practical, concrete uses of animals, e.g., for food, for clothing, for experimentation, for entertainment, etc.,as well as stronger skills at identifying and evaluating other reasons given for and against such uses of animals;
    • more deeply develop their own views on the nature of our obligations to animals and be abler to provide moral defenses of their views and respond to critical objections and questions.
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