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5.15: Galant Schemata - Summary

  • Page ID
    62198
  • Openings (presentations)

    The following schemata tend to appear at the opening of themes, often as the framework for a presentation phrase in a sentence.

    *Note: though these schemata are presented in major mode, most of these can be converted directly to minor mode.

    The Meyer

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    The Jupiter

    clipboard_e06becbbd71ff5c5066eb621efc59b989.png

    or

    clipboard_e8ede117d16cf089c0db11cff6c545475.png

    The Aprile

    clipboard_ed44949dc86df57dee198299a6f8e1ada.png

    The Pastorella

    clipboard_efdcf2bac3e5fdebb6e94119e35e732c0.png

    The Do–Re–Mi

    Though common in a three-stage version, this four-stage version is more typical when employed in a presentation phrase.

    clipboard_efdfdb9625d2c3888cfc78b6da0a0bb26.png

    (Root-position dominant chords may also be used.)

    Sol–Fa–Mi

    clipboard_e8ed87675e7fb0f3e2bc19bcf96f93205.png

    or

    clipboard_e6595c194592b874fa6d2ea8b8d02c248.png

    The Romanesca

    clipboard_e6d5289a6fd56aaafde1bf78cf4bf8c7d.png

    The melody of this schema is quite flexible. The bass/harmony are the more definitive elements. Also note that, in contrast to the other “presentation” schemata, this schema is far more common in slower movements.

    Continuing schemata

    The Prinner

    clipboard_e015606af93cafa46c2fe24d78dab11bb.png

    or

    clipboard_e4fe9bd317441751c3ddea487d598bde4.png

    The Modulating Prinner

    This schema modulates from the tonic to the dominant. It is a common continuation phrase for a modulating sentence. It is also a common framework for a tutti passage that begins the transition module of a sonata/symphony movement.

    clipboard_e9a2d401da7a4d5ac721fbd682b335db1.png

    or

    clipboard_ee98a3af686f4f018b5eff2174377d6af.png

    The Passo Indietro

    clipboard_e8b2aeb49ebc1e27babe932c3abe0aab2.png

    This is essentially the first two stages of a Prinner. The latter two stages are often elided (cut away) in order to make room for a cadence pattern.

    Like the Prinner, the Passo Indietro has a “modulating version” (the first two stages of the Modulating Prinner).

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    Cadences

    The Simple PAC

    clipboard_e63dc95f808406776f791b4ff8316812d.png

    The Simple IAC

    clipboard_e8f59638ff497821f05facb9a7169b57c.png

    The fa–fi–sol HC

    This is a common approach to a half cadence, especially at the end of a sonata movement’s transition (TR) module. The definitive element is the bass line: fafisol. The redoti melody is common, and the most active of the possibilities that fit the harmonies. See Mozart’s K. 545, I., mm. 10–11, and K. 333, I., mm. 17–18, for examples.

    clipboard_eb5a66369886e9cd92ada1cc34b9b3bc7.png

    The Compound PAC

    clipboard_e710c052c082b15ac30a3440adf929230.png

    The Compound IAC

    clipboard_e980952780ff0cf095f57577fc3d13791.png

    The Compound HC

    clipboard_eaf1e57af31eaa432346398f1ec1bf604.png

    (The Compound HC can be approached by any S chord, or even the end of the tonic prolongational zone.)

    There are, of course, more cadence patterns than these, but these are the most straightforward for framing an improvisation, or a simple model composition. See Classical cadence types for more details about standard cadential patterns.

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