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1.6: Harmony and Tonality

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    72350
  • Introduction

    Please click on the following link and read all four pages of the Harmony and Tonality section: Harmony and Tonality.

    Chords

    In the Western tradition, in music after the seventeenth century, harmony is created by using chords. A chord with three members is called a triad because it has three members, not because it is necessarily built in thirds. Depending on the size of the intervals being used, different qualities of chords are formed. In popular and jazz harmony, chords are named by their root plus various terms and characters indicating their qualities. To keep the nomenclature as simple as possible, some defaults are accepted (not tabulated here). For example, the chord members C, E, and G, form a C Major triad, called by default simply a C chord. In an A chord (pronounced A-flat), the members are A, C, and E.

    In many types of music, notably baroque, romantic, modern and jazz, chords are often augmented with “tensions.” A tension is an additional chord member that creates a relatively dissonant interval in relation to the bass. Following the tertian practice of building chords by stacking thirds, the simplest first tension is added to a triad by stacking on top of the existing root, third, and fifth, another third above the fifth, giving a new, potentially dissonant member the interval of a seventh away from the root and therefore called the “seventh” of the chord, and producing a four-note chord, called a “seventh chord.”

    Depending on the widths of the individual thirds stacked to build the chord, the interval between the root and the seventh of the chord may be major, minor, or diminished. (The interval of an augmented seventh reproduces the root, and is therefore left out of the chordal nomenclature.) The nomenclature allows that, by default, “C7″ indicates a chord with a root, third, fifth, and seventh spelled C, E, G, and B. Other types of seventh chords must be named more explicitly, such as “C Major 7” (spelled C, E, G, B), “C augmented 7” (here the word augmented applies to the fifth, not the seventh, spelled C, E, G, B), etc.

    Continuing to stack thirds on top of a seventh chord produces extensions, and brings in the “extended tensions” or “upper tensions” (those more than an octave above the root when stacked in thirds), the ninths, elevenths, and thirteenths. This creates the chords named after them. (Note that except for dyads and triads, tertian chord types are named for the interval of the largest size and magnitude in use in the stack, not for the number of chord members : thus a ninth chord has five members [tonic, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th], not nine.) Extensions beyond the thirteenth reproduce existing chord members and are (usually) left out of the nomenclature. Complex harmonies based on extended chords are found in abundance in jazz, late-romantic music, modern orchestral works, film music, etc.

    Typically, in the classical Common practice period a dissonant chord (chord with tension) resolves to a consonant chord. Harmonization usually sounds pleasant to the ear when there is a balance between the consonant and dissonant sounds. In simple words, that occurs when there is a balance between “tense” and “relaxed” moments. For this reason, usually tension is “prepared” and then “resolved.”

    Preparing tension means to place a series of consonant chords that lead smoothly to the dissonant chord. In this way the composer ensures introducing tension smoothly, without disturbing the listener. Once the piece reaches its sub-climax, the listener needs a moment of relaxation to clear up the tension, which is obtained by playing a consonant chord that resolves the tension of the previous chords. The clearing of this tension usually sounds pleasant to the listener, though this is not always the case in late-nineteenth century music, such as Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner.

    Theory Lesson: Introduction to Chords

    Click on the link Introduction to Chords to work on an interactive theory lesson about chords, which are a combination of three or more notes.

     

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