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2.13: Reading and Review Questions

  • Page ID
    8796
  • 1. How consistent, or logically-developed, are the metaphors in Wyatt’s poetry? Consider, for example, the following metaphors in “The Long Love:” love harbors in his heart and keeps residence there; love camps and spreads a banner; love is like a deer taking refuge in a forest, etc.

    2. In “My Galley,” how effective, if at all, is the extended comparison of the speaker to a storm-tossed ship?

    3. “Whoso List to Hunt” is a translation of a Petrarchan sonnet. Yet, some scholars perceive in it autobiographical references to Wyatt’s supposed relationship with Anne Boleyn (“Noli me tangere, for Caesar’s I am,/ And wild for to hold, though I seem tame”). How, if at all, does Wyatt introduce personal elements in his sonnets? How sincere are his sonnets? How do you know?

    4. In “My Lute, Awake!” Wyatt seems to be displaying his own artfulness. His song is his complaint to an unnamed desired lady, and when he ends the song, his lute will be silent. What is the purpose of this art, do you think? Between the lady and his art, which is more important to Wyatt, do you think? How do you know?

    5. “And Wilt Thou Leave Me Thus?” repeats lines almost like a song. Do these repetitions add meaning to the poem, or are they ornamental? How do you know?

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