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3.2: Introductions (模块二- 介绍)

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    33162
  • Module II: Introductions

    模块二:介绍

    Scenario 2.1: Zhang Wenshan introduces himself to the new classmates.

    ZhW:

    我姓张,我叫张文山。你们可以叫我文山。

    I, me

    xìng

    be surnamed

    jiào

    be called

    你们

    nǐmen

    you (plural)

    可以

    kěyǐ

    can, may

    文山

    Wénshān

    given name

    Note:

    张文山 is a typical Chinese name. 张 is a common Chinese surname. 文山 is the given name, which always comes after the surname. In China, people introduce their surname first to show respect to their ancestors.

    姓 is used to give the surname, and 叫can be used to give the full name or the given name.


    Scenario 2.2: Zhang Guoxin introduces his family at a friend’s party.

    ZhG:

    这是我的爱人。那是我的孩子。

    zhè

    this

    shì

    be

    我的

    wǒ de

    my, mine

    爱人

    àirén

    spouse

    that

    孩子

    háizi

    child, children

    Note:

    的 a particle, is used to indicate possession, as in 你的 (your, yours),李明的 (Li Ming’s).

    爱人refers to husband or wife, and is commonly used in mainland China. In Taiwan and Hong Kong, people usually use tàitài (太太, wife) and xiānshēng (先生, husband).



    Scenario 2.3: Zhang Guoxin introduces his business partners at a reception.

    ZhG:

    这位是白先生。那位是李女士。

    wèi

    [M] for people

    Bái

    Chinese surname

    先生

    xiānshēng

    Mr.

    女士

    Nǚshì

    Ms.

    Note:

    位 is a polite measure word for people. Unlike English, where most nouns are counted or specified directly (one room, this book), in Chinese a so-called measure word must be used before a noun if it is counted or specified. The pattern is:

    This/That + Measure + Noun

    这 位 先生

    (lit. this gentleman)

    Sometimes, the context makes the nouns unnecessary.

    TITLE Besides husband, 先生 also refers to gentleman and Mr.; 女士 is a formal, polite title for a married or unmarried woman. 先生 and女士 can both be used alone or after the surname. 小姐 (Xiǎojiě,Miss) is often used to refer to a young lady in a formal conversation.

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