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7.9: References

  • Page ID
    9902
  • This chapter was edited by Nathaniel C. Green, with content contributions by Justin Clark, Adam Costanzo, Stephanie Gamble, Dale Kretz, Julie Richter, Bryan Rindfleisch, Angela Riotto, James Risk, Cara Rogers, Jonathan Wilfred Wilson, and Charlton Yingling.

    Recommended citation: Justin Clark et al., “The Early Republic,” Nathaniel C. Green, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Appleby, Joyce. Liberalism and Republicanism in the Historical Imagination. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1992.
    • Bailey, Jeremy D. Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
    • Blackhawk, Ned. Violence over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008.
    • Bradburn, Douglas. The Citizenship Revolution: Politics and the Creation of the American Union, 1774–1804. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009.
    • Cleves, Rachel Hope. The Reign of Terror in America: Visions of Violence from Anti-Jacobinism to Antislavery. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
    • Dubois, Laurent. Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005.
    • Edmunds, R. David. The Shawnee Prophet. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.
    • Eustace, Nicole. 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012.
    • Fabian, Ann. The Skull Collectors: Race, Science, and America’s Unburied Dead. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.
    • Freeman, Joanne B. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001.
    • Furstenberg, François. In the Name of the Father: Washington’s Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation. New York: Penguin, 2006.
    • Kastor, Peter J. The Nation’s Crucible: The Louisiana Purchase and the Creation of America. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004.
    • Kelley, Mary. Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America’s Republic. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006.
    • Kerber, Linda. Federalists in Dissent: Imagery and Ideology in Jeffersonian America. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1970.
    • _________. Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
    • Lewis, Jan. The Pursuit of Happiness: Family and Values in Jefferson’s Virginia. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1985.
    • Manion, Jen. Liberty’s Prisoners: Carceral Culture in Early America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.
    • Onuf, Peter. Jefferson’s Empire: The Language of American Nationhood. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000.
    • Porterfield, Amanda. Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in the New American Nation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012.
    • Rothman, Adam. Slave Country: American Expansion and the Origins of the Deep South. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.
    • Rothman, Joshua D. Notorious in the Neighborhood: Sex and Families Across the Color Line in Virginia, 1787–1861. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.
    • Sidbury, James. Ploughshares into Swords: Race, Rebellion, and Identity in Gabriel’s Virginia, 1730–1810. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
    • Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll. This Violent Empire: The Birth of an American National Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
    • Taylor, Alan. The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies. New York: Random House, 2010.
    • Waldstreicher, David. In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism 1776–1820. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

    Notes

    1. Thomas Paine, Common Sense (1776), in Eric Foner, ed., Thomas Paine: Collected Writings (New York: Library of America, 1995), 23.
    2. David Walker, Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World, But in Particular, and Very Expressly, to Those of The United States of America (New York: Hill and Wang, 1995), 21, 56
    3. John Russwurm, “The Condition and Prospects of Hayti,” in African Americans and the Haitian Revolution: Selected Essays and Historical Documents, ed. Maurice Jackson and Jacqueline Bacon (New York: Routledge, 2013), 168
    4. “Republic of Hayti,” Colored American, March 15, 1838, 2.
    5. Benjamin Rush, “Observations Intended to Favour a Supposition That the Black Color (As It Is Called) of the Negroes is Derived from the Leprosy,” Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 4 (1799): 289–297.
    6. Banneker to Jefferson, August 19, 1791, Founders Online, National Archives, http://founders.archives.gov/documen.../01-22-02-0049.
    7. Fisher Ames, “The Mire of a Democracy,” in W. B. Allen, ed., Works of Fisher Ames, 2 vols. (Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund, 1984), Vol. 1: 6, 7.
    8. Jefferson to John Garland Jefferson, January 25, 1810, in The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series, ed. Julian P. Boyd et al., 40 vols. to date (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1950–), Vol. 2: 183. Hereafter cited as PTJ, RS.
    9. Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, September 6, 1819, http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/137.html.
    10. Philadelphia Independent Gazetteer June 5, 1787, in Merrill Jensen, John P. Kaminski, Philadelphia Independent Gazetteer, June 5, 1787, in Merrill Jensen, John P. Kaminski, Gaspare J. Saladino, et al., eds., The Documentary History of the Ratification of the Constitution, 22 vols. to date (Madison: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1976–), Vol. 13: 126–127. The digital edition of the first twenty volumes is available through the University of Virginia Press Rotunda project, edited by John P. Kaminski, Gaspare J. Saladino, et al., http://rotunda.upress.virginia.edu/founders/RNCN.html. Hereafter cited as DHRC.
    11. Alexandria Times, and District of Columbia Daily Advertiser (Alexandria, VA), July 2, 1800; Constitutional Telegraphe (Boston, MA), February 15 and December 6, 1800; Carlisle Gazette (Carlisle, PA), November 6, 1799.
    12. See Linda K. Kerber, Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997); and Mary Kelley, Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America’s Republic (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006).
    13. Jefferson to John B. Colvin, September 20, 1810, in PTJ, RS 3: 99, 100, 101.
    14. Jefferson to the Earl of Buchan Washington, July 10, 1803, in Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 40 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013), 708–709.
    15. For the Hemings controversy and the DNA evidence, see Annette Gordon-Reed, Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1997).
    16. Recorder (Richmond, VA), November 3, 1802.
    17. The Pretensions of Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency Examined; and the Charges Against John Adams Refuted. Addressed to the Citizens of America in General; and Particularly to the Electors of the President, 2 vols. (Philadelphia: s.n., 1796).
    18. See, for example, Anthony F. C. Wallace, The Death and Rebirth of the Seneca (New York: Random House, 1969), 111.
    19. Gregory Dowd, A Spirited Resistance: The North American Indian Struggle for Unity, 1745–1815 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992), 33.
    20. Adam Rothman, Slave Country: American Expansion and the Origins of the Deep South (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009).
    21. Nicole Eustace, 1812: War and the Passions of Patriotism (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012), 149–153.
    22. Quoted in Edward Eggleston and Elizabeth Eggleston Seelye, Tecumseh and the Shawnee Prophet (New York: Dodd, Mead, 1878), 309.
    23. Amanda Porterfield, Conceived in Doubt: Religion and Politics in the New American Nation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012), 187.
    24. Alan Taylor, The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, and Indian Allies (New York: Random House, 2010), 5.
    25. Donald R. Hickey, Glorious Victory: Andrew Jackson and the Battle of New Orleans (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015), 8.
    26. “Martin Bibbings, “The Battle,” in Tim Voelcker, ed., Broke of the Shannon: And the War of 1812 (London: Seaworth Publishing, 2013), 138.
    27. Ronald L. Drez, The War of 1812: Conflict and Deception (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2014), 154.
    28. Morton Keller, America’s Three Regimes: A New Political History: A New Political History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007), 69.
    29. Brian Balogh, A Government Out of Sight: The Mystery of National Authority in Nineteenth-Century America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 130.
    30. Inaugural Address, March 4, 1817,” in Stanislaus Murray Hamilton, ed., The Writings of James Monroe (New York: Putnam, 1902), Vol. 6: 11
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