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6.13: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9892
  • This chapter was edited by Tara Strauch, with content contributions by Marco Basile, Nathaniel C. Green, Brenden Kennedy, Spencer McBride, Andrea Nero, Cara Rogers, Tara Strauch, Michael Harrison Taylor, Jordan Taylor, Kevin Wisniewski, and Ben Wright.

    Recommended citation: Marco Basile et al., “A New Nation,” Tara Strauch, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Allgor, Catherine. Parlor Politics: In which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000.
    • Appleby, Joyce. Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 2001.
    • Bartolini-Tuazon, Kathleen. For Fear of an Elective King: George Washington and the Presidential Title Controversy of 1789. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2014.
    • Beeman, Richard, Stephen Botein, and Edward C. Carter II eds. Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.
    • Bilder, Mary Sarah. Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2015.
    • Bouton, Terry. “A Road Closed: Rural Insurgency in Post-Independence Pennsylvania,” Journal of American History 87:3 (December 2000): 855-887.
    • Cunningham, Noble E. The Jeffersonian Republicans: The Formation of Party Organization, 1789-1801. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.
    • Dunn, Susan. Jefferson’s Second Revolution: The Election of 1800 and the Triumph of Republicanism. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004.
    • Edling, Max. A Revolution in Favor of Government: Origins of the U.S. Constitution and the Making of the American State. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003
    • Gordon-Reed, Annette. The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. New York: W. W. Norton, 2008.
    • Halperin, Terri Diane. The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798: Testing the Constitution. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016.
    • Holton, Woody. Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution. 1st edition. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007.
    • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
    • Maier, Pauline. Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2010.
    • Papenfuse, Eric Robert. “Unleashing the ‘Wildness’: The Mobilization of Grassroots Antifederalism in Maryland,” Journal of the Early Republic 16:1 (Spring 1996): 73-106.
    • Pasley, Jeffrey L. The First Presidential Contest: 1796 and the Founding of American Democracy. Lawrence: The University of Kansas Press, 2013.
    • Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll. “Dis-Covering the Subject of the ‘Great Constitutional Discussion,’ 1786-1789,” Journal of American History 79:3 (December 1992): 841-873
    • Taylor, Alan. William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic. Reprint edition. New York: Vintage, 1996.
    • Rakove, Jack N. Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution. New York: Vintage Books, 1996.
    • Salmon, Marylynn. Women and the Law of Property in Early America. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1989.
    • Sharp, James Roger. American Politics in the Early Republic: The New Nation in Crisis. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993.
    • Slaughter, Thomas P. The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
    • Waldstreicher, David. In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes : The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820. Chapel Hill : Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
    • Wood, Gordon. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.
    • Zagarri, Rosemarie. Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007.
    • Allgor, Catherine. Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000.
    • Appleby, Joyce. Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2001.
    • Bartolini-Tuazon, Kathleen. For Fear of an Elective King: George Washington and the Presidential Title Controversy of 1789. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014.
    • Beeman, Richard, Stephen Botein, and Edward C. Carter II, eds. Beyond Confederation: Origins of the Constitution and American National Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.
    • Bilder, Mary Sarah. Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015.
    • Bouton, Terry. “A Road Closed: Rural Insurgency in Post-Independence Pennsylvania.” Journal of American History 87, no. 3 (December 2000): 855–887.
    • Cunningham, Noble E. The Jeffersonian Republicans: The Formation of Party Organization, 1789–1801. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.
    • Dunn, Susan. Jefferson’s Second Revolution: The Election of 1800 and the Triumph of Republicanism. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004.
    • Edling, Max. A Revolution in Favor of Government: Origins of the U.S. Constitution and the Making of the American State. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.
    • Gordon-Reed, Annette. The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. New York: Norton, 2008.
    • Halperin, Terri Diane. The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798: Testing the Constitution. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016.
    • Holton, Woody. Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007.
    • Kierner, Cynthia A. Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.
    • Maier, Pauline. Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787–1788. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2010.
    • Papenfuse, Eric Robert. “Unleashing the ‘Wildness’: The Mobilization of Grassroots Antifederalism in Maryland.” Journal of the Early Republic 16, no. 1 (Spring 1996): 73–106.
    • Pasley, Jeffrey L. The First Presidential Contest: 1796 and the Founding of American Democracy. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2013.
    • Rakove, Jack N. Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution. New York: Vintage Books, 1996.
    • Salmon, Marylynn. Women and the Law of Property in Early America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989.
    • Sharp, James Roger. American Politics in the Early Republic: The New Nation in Crisis. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1993.
    • Slaughter, Thomas P. The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
    • Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll. “Dis-Covering the Subject of the ‘Great Constitutional Discussion,’ 1786–1789.” Journal of American History 79, no. 3 (December 1992): 841–873.
    • Taylor, Alan. William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic. New York: Vintage, 1996.
    • Waldstreicher, David. In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes : The Making of American Nationalism, 1776–1820. Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 1997.
    • Wood, Gordon. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2011.
    • Zagarri, Rosemarie. Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007

    Notes

    1. Francis Hopkinson, An Account of the Grand Federal Procession, Philadelphia, July 4, 1788 (Philadelphia: Carey, 1788).
    2. George Washington, Thanksgiving Proclamation, October, 3, 1789; Fed. Reg., Presidential Proclamations, 1791–1991.
    3. Hampshire Gazette (CT), September 13, 1786.
    4. James Madison, The Federalist Papers, (New York: Signet Classics, 2003), no. 63.
    5. Woody Holton, Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007), 8–9.
    6. Madison took an active role during the convention. He also did more than anyone else to shape historians’ understandings of the convention by taking meticulous notes. Many of the quotes included here come from Madison’s notes. To learn more about this important document, read Mary Sarah Bilder, Madison’s Hand: Revising the Constitutional Convention (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015).
    7. Virginia (Randolph) Plan as Amended (National Archives Microfilm Publication M866, 1 roll); The Official Records of the Constitutional Convention; Records of the Continental and Confederation Congresses and the Constitutional Convention, 1774–1789, Record Group 360; National Archives.
    8. Richard Beeman, Plain, Honest Men: The Making of the American Constitution (New York: Random House, 2009), 114
    9. Herbert J. Storing, What the Anti-Federalists Were For: The Political Thought of the Opponents of the Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981), 16.
    10. Ray Raphael, Mr. President: How and Why the Founders Created a Chief Executive (New York: Knopf, 2012), 50. See also Kathleen Bartoloni-Tuazon, For Fear of an Elected King: George Washington and the Presidential Title Controversy of 1789 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2014). [
    11. David J. Siemers, Ratifying the Republic: Antifederalists and Federalists in Constitutional Time (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2002).
    12. Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, The Federalist Papers, ed. Ian Shapiro (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009).
    13. Pauline Maier, Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787–1788 (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2010), 225–237.
    14. David Waldstreicher, Slavery’s Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (New York: Hill and Wang, 2009)
    15. Carson Holloway, Hamilton Versus Jefferson in the Washington Administration: Completing the Founding or Betraying the Founding? (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015).
    16. Alexander Hamilton, The Works of Alexander Hamilton, Volume 1, ed. Henry Cabot Lodge, ed. (New York: Putnam, 1904), 70, 408.
    17. Alexander Hamilton, Report on Manufactures (New York: Childs and Swaine, 1791).
    18. James H. Hutson, ed., Supplement to Max Farrand’s the Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1987), 119.
    19. Hamilton, Report on Manufactures).
    20. Richard Sylla, “National Foundations: Public Credit, the National Bank, and Securities Markets,” in Founding Choices: American Economic Policy in the 1790s, ed. Douglas A. Irwin and Richard Sylla (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011), 68.
    21. Thomas P. Slaughter, The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986).
    22. “Proclamation of Neutrality, 1793,” in A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Prepared Under the Direction of the Joint Committee on printing, of the House and Senate Pursuant to an Act of the Fifty-Second Congress of the United States (New York: Bureau of National Literature, 1897).
    23. United States, Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, signed at London November 19, 1794, Submitted to the Senate June 8, Resolution of Advice and Consent, on condition, June 24, 1795. Ratified by the United States August 14, 1795. Ratified by Great Britain October 28, 1795. Ratifications exchanged at London October 28, 1795. Proclaimed February 29, 1796
    24. Elizabeth Fox-Genovese and Eugene D. Genovese, The Mind of the Master Class: History and Faith in the Southern Slaveholders Worldview (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 18.
    25. From Thomas Jefferson to William Short, 3 January 1793,” Founders Online, National Archives. http://founders.archives.gov/documen.../01-25-02-0016, last modified June 29, 2015; The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, vol. 25, 1 January–10 May 1793, ed. John Catanzariti (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992), 14–1.
    26. Robert Goodloe Harper, June 18, 1798, quoted in American Daily Advertiser (Philadelphia), June 20, 1798.
    27. Robert J. Alderson Jr., This Bright Era of Happy Revolutions: French Consul Michel-Ange-Bernard Mangourit and International Republicanism in Charleston, 1792–1794 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2008).
    28. Rachel Hope Cleves, The Reign of Terror in America: Visions of Violence from Anti-Jacobinism to Antislavery (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 47.
    29. Alien Act, July 6, 1798, and An Act in Addition to the Act, Entitled “An Act for the Punishment of Certain Crimes Against the United States,” July 14, 1798; Fifth Congress; Enrolled Acts and Resolutions; General Records of the United States Government; Record Group 11; National Archives.
    30. James Wilson, Congressional Debate, December 1, 1787, in Jonathan Elliot, ed., The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution as Recommended by the General Convention at Philadelphia in 1787, Vol. 2 (New York: s.n., 1888) 448–450.
    31. Tunis Wortman, A Treatise Concerning Political Enquiry, and the Liberty of the Press (New York: Forman, 1800), 181.
    32. George Hay, An Essay on the Liberty of the Press (Philadelphia: s.n., 1799), 43.
    33. Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, August 28, 1789, from The Works of Thomas Jefferson in Twelve Volumes, Federal Edition, ed. Paul Leicester Ford. http://www.loc.gov/resource/mtj1.011_0853_0861
    34. Francis Newton Thorpe, ed., The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the States, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America Compiled and Edited Under the Act of Congress of June 30, 1906 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1909).
    35. Thomas Jefferson, An Act for Establishing Religious Freedom, 16 January 1786, Manuscript, Records of the General Assembly, Enrolled Bills, Record Group 78, Library of Virginia.
    36. Catherine Allgor, Parlor Politics: In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000), 14.
    37. James T. Callender, The Prospect Before Us (Richmond: s.n., 1800).
    38. Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Spencer Roane, September 6, 1819, in The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, 20 vols., ed. Albert Ellery Bergh (Washington, DC: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association of the United States, 1903), 142.
    39. Harold H. Bruff, Untrodden Ground: How Presidents Interpret the Constitution (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015), 65.
    40. Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers (New York: Signet Classics, 2003), no. 85.
    41. George Washington, Farewell Address, Annals of Congress, 4th Congress, 2869–2870.
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