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Humanities Libertexts

13.8: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9974
  • This chapter was edited by Jesse Gant, with content contributions by Jeffrey Bain-Conkin, Matthew A. Byron, Christopher Childers, Jesse Gant, Christopher Null, Ryan Poe, Michael Robinson, Nicholas Wood, Michael Woods, and Ben Wright.

    Recommended citation: Jeffrey Bain-Conkin et al., “The Sectional Crisis,” Jesse Gant, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Bacon, Margaret Hope. But One Race: The Life of Robert Purvis. Albany: SUNY Press, 2012.
    • Baker, Jean H. Affairs of Party: The Political Culture of Northern Democrats in the Mid-Nineteenth Century. New York: Fordham University Press, 1983.
    • Berlin, Ira. Generations of Captivity: A History of African-American Slaves. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2003.
    • Boydston, Jeanne. Home and Work: Housework, Wages, and the Ideology of Labor in the Early Republic. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.
    • Bracey, Christopher Alan, Paul Finkelman, and David Thomas Konig, eds. The Dred Scott Case: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2010.
    • Cutter, Barbara. Domestic Devils, Battlefield Angels: The Radicalization of American Womanhood, 1830–1865. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003.
    • Engs, Robert F., and Randall M. Miller, eds. The Birth of the Grand Old Party: The Republicans’ First Generation. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002.
    • Etcheson, Nicole. Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.
    • Flexnor, Eleanor. Century of Struggle: The Women’s Rights Movement in the United States. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1975.
    • Foner, Eric. Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
    • Grant, Susan-Mary. North over South: Northern Nationalism and American Identity in the Antebellum Era. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000.
    • Holt, Michael F. The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
    • Howe, Daniel Walker. The Political Culture of the American Whigs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979.
    • Jeffrey, Julie Roy. The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism: Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Jones, Martha S. All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture, 1830–1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007.
    • Kantrowitz, Stephen. More Than Freedom: Fighting for Black Citizenship in a White Republic, 1829–1889. New York: Penguin, 2012.
    • McDaniel, W. Caleb. The Problem of Democracy in the Age of Slavery: Garrisonian Abolitionists and Transatlantic Reform. Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2013.
    • Oakes, James. The Scorpion’s Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War. New York: Norton, 2014.
    • Potter, David M. The Impending Crisis, 1848–1861. New York: HarperCollins, 1976.
    • Quarles, Benjamin. Allies for Freedom: Blacks and John Brown. New York: Oxford University Press, 1974.
    • Robertson, Stacey. Hearts Beating for Liberty: Women Abolitionists in the Old Northwest. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.
    • Sinha, Manisha. The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
    • Smith, Kimberly K. The Dominion of Voice: Riot, Reason and Romance in Antebellum American Political Thought. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1999.
    • Varon, Elizabeth. Disunion! The Coming of the American Civil War, 1789–1859. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
    • Zaeske, Susan. Signatures of Citizenship: Petitioning, Antislavery, and Women’s Political Identity. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003

    Notes

    1. David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (New York: Oxford University Press, 1966).
    2. David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770–1823 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 164–212.
    3. See “Black Founders: The Free Black Community in the Early Republic,” digital exhibit, Library Company of Philadelphia. http://www.librarycompany.org/blackfounders/, accessed May 8, 2018.
    4. Northwest Ordinance, July 13, 1787; Charles C. Tansill, ed., Documents Illustrative of the Formation of the Union of the American States (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1927), House Document No. 398. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/nworder.asp.
    5. Stephen Middleton, The Black Laws: Race and the Legal Process in Early Ohio (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2005).
    6. The National Register: A Weekly Paper, Containing a Series of the Important Public Documents, and the Proceedings of Congress, Volume VII (Washington City: 1819), 125.
    7. Conference committee report on the Missouri Compromise, March 1, 1820; Joint Committee of Conference on the Missouri Bill, 03/01/1820-03/06/1820; Record Group 128l; Records of Joint Committees of Congress, 1789-1989; National Archives. https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=22&page=transcript
    8. William M. Wiecek, The Sources of Antislavery Constitutionalism in America, 1760–1848 (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977).
    9. Richard Furman, Rev. Dr. Richard Furman’s Exposition of the Views of the Baptists, Relative to the Colored Population of the United States (Charleston, SC: Miller, 1923), 1.
    10. Nicholas Wood, “‘A Sacrifice on the Altar of Slavery’: Doughface Politics and Black Disenfranchisement in Pennsylvania, 1837–1838,” Journal of the Early Republic 31, no. 1 (Spring 2011): 75–106.
    11. Michael F. Holt, The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999).
    12. James K. Polk: “Inaugural Address,” March 4, 1845. Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=25814.
    13. Richard Peters, Report of the Case of Edward Prigg against the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: Johnson, 1842).
    14. Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself (Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845). http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass/douglass.html).
    15. See Sojourner Truth, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, ed. Olive Gilbert (Boston: Author, 1850), http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/truth/1850/1850.html; Maria Stewart, Maria W. Stewart: America’s First Black Woman Political Writer, ed. Marilyn Richardson (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987); James McCune Smith, The Works of James McCune Smith: Black Intellectual and Abolitionist, ed. John Stauffer (New York: Oxford University Press, 2007); Frank A. Rollin, Life and Public Services of Martin R. Delaney (Boston: Lee and Shephard, 1868), especially 313–367. https://archive.org/details/lifepublicservic00inroll.
    16. Eric Foner, Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War (New York: Oxford University Press, 1970).
    17. Joseph Rayback, Free Soil: The Election of 1848 (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2014).
    18. Eleanor Flexnor, Century of Struggle: The Women’s Rights Movement in the United States (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1975).
    19. Report of the Woman’s Rights Convention, Held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., July 19th and 20th, 1848 (Rochester: Dick, 1848).
    20. Gloria J. Browne-Marshall, Race, Law and American Society, Second Edition (New York: Routledge, 2013), 56.
    21. Michael Winship, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin: History of the Book in the 19th-Century United States” (Charlottesville: University of Virginia, 2007). http://utc.iath.virginia.edu/interpret/exhibits/winship/winship.html, accessed August 1, 2015.
    22. Charles Harold Nichols, Many Thousand Gone: The Ex-slaves’ Account of Their Bondage and Freedom (Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, 1963), 156.
    23. Amos A. Lawrence to Giles Richards, June 1, 1854, quoted in Jane J. Pease and William H. Pease, eds., The Fugitive Slave Law and Anthony Burns: A Problem in Law Enforcement (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1975), 43.
    24. Tyler Anbinder, Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings and the Politics of the 1850s (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).
    25. Charles Sumner, The Crime Against Kansas, Speech of Hon. Charles Sumner in the Senate of the United States (New York: Greeley and McElrath, 1856). https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/resources/pdf/CrimeAgainstKSSpeech.pdf.
    26. Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004).
    27. Williamjames Hull Hoffer, The Caning of Charles Sumner: Honor, Idealism, and the Origins of the Civil War (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010), 92.
    28. Abraham Lincoln, “Peoria Speech, October 16, 1854,” in Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, ed. Roy P. Basler (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1953), 247–283. https://www.nps.gov/liho/learn/histo...oriaspeech.htm.
    29. Judgment in the U.S. Supreme Court Case Dred Scott v. John F.A. Sanford, March 6, 1857; Case Files 1792-1995; Record Group 267; Records of the Supreme Court of the United States; National Archives. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=29.
    30. Rodney O. Davis and Douglas L. Wilson, eds., The Lincoln Douglas Debates (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2008), 68.
    31. Republican Party Platforms: “Republican Party Platform of 1860,” May 17, 1860. Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=29620.
    32. Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860–1864, Volume 1 (Hartford, CT: Case, 1864), 366–367.
    33. “Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union,” The Avalon Project at the Yale Law School. http://avalon.law.yale.edu/19th_century/csa_scarsec.asp., accessed August 1, 2015.
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