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Humanities Libertexts

10.9: Reference Material

  • Page ID
    9945
  • This chapter was edited by Emily Conroy-Krutz, with content contributions by Elena Abbott, Cameron Blevins, Frank Cirillo, Justin Clark, Emily Conroy-Krutz, Nicolas Hoffmann, Christopher C. Jones, Jonathan Koefoed, Charles McCrary, William E. Skidmore, Megan Stanton, Kelly Weber, and Ben Wright.

    Recommended citation: Elena Abbott et al., “Religion and Reform,” Emily Conroy-Krutz, ed., in The American Yawp, eds. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

    Recommended Reading

    • Berg, Barbara J. The Remembered Gates: Origins of American Feminism, The Woman and the City 1800-1860. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
    • Boylan, Anne. The Origins of Women’s Activism: New York and Boston, 1797-1840. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolonia Press, 2002.
    • Brekus, Catherine A. Strangers and Pilgrims: Female Preaching in America, 1740-1845. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Conroy-Krutz, Emily. Christian Imperialism: Converting the World in the Early American Republic. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2015.
    • Dorsey, Bruce. Reforming Men and Women: Gender in the Antebellum City. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002.
    • DuBois, Ellen. Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women’s Movement in America, 1848-1869. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999.
    • Ginzberg, Lori. Women and the Work of Benevolence: Morality, Politics, and Class in the 19th Century United States. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990.
    • Ginzberg, Lori. Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman’s Rights in Antebellum New York. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
    • Hatch, Nathan O. The Democratization of American Christianity. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989.
    • Haynes, April R. Rioutous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth Century America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015.
    • Hempton, David Methodism: Empire of the Spirit. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005.
    • Hewitt, Nancy. Women’s Activism and Social Change: Rochester, New York 1822-1872. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1984.
    • Jeffrey, Julie Roy. The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism: Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.
    • Johnson, Paul. A Shopkeepers Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815-1837. New York: Hill and Wang, 2004.
    • Juster, Susan. Disorderly Women: Sexual Politics and Evangelicalism in Revolutionary New England. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994.
    • Lerner, Gerda. The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina: Pioneers for Women’s Rights and Abolition. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.
    • Makdisi, Ussama. Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008.
    • McDaniel, W. Caleb. The Problem of Democracy in the Age of Slavery: Garrisonian Abolitionists and Transatlantic Reform. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013.
    • Muncy, Raymond Lee. Sex and Marriage in Utopian Communities: 19th Century America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1973.
    • Newman, Richard S., The Transformation of American Abolitionism: Fighting Slavery in the Early Republic. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002.
    • Ryan, Mary. Cradle of the Middle Class: The Family in Oneida County, New York, 1790-1865. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981.
    • Ryan, Susan M. The Grammar of Good Intentions: Race and the Antebellum Culture of Benevolence. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003.
    • Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.
    • Stewart, James Brewer. Holy Warriors: The Abolitionists and American Slavery. New York: Hill and Wang, 1996.
    • Tomek, Beverly C. Colonization and Its Discontents: Emancipation, Emigration, and Antislavery in Antebellum Pennsylvania. New York: New York University Press, 2011.
    • Walters, Ronald. American Reformers, 1815-1860. New York: Hill and Wang, 1997.
    • Berg, Barbara J. The Remembered Gates: Origins of American Feminism, The Woman and the City 1800–1860. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
    • Boylan, Anne. The Origins of Women’s Activism: New York and Boston, 1797–1840. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002.
    • Brekus, Catherine A. Strangers and Pilgrims: Female Preaching in America, 1740–1845. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Conroy-Krutz, Emily. Christian Imperialism: Converting the World in the Early American Republic. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015.
    • Dorsey, Bruce. Reforming Men and Women: Gender in the Antebellum City. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2002.
    • DuBois, Ellen. Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women’s Movement in America, 1848–1869. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1999.
    • Ginzberg, Lori D. Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman’s Rights in Antebellum New York. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
    • Ginzberg, Lori. Women and the Work of Benevolence: Morality, Politics, and Class in the 19th Century United States. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990.
    • Hatch, Nathan O. The Democratization of American Christianity. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989.
    • Haynes, April R. Riotous Flesh: Women, Physiology, and the Solitary Vice in Nineteenth Century America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015.
    • Hempton, David. Methodism: Empire of the Spirit. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2005.
    • Hewitt, Nancy. Women’s Activism and Social Change: Rochester, New York 1822–1872. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1984.
    • Jeffrey, Julie Roy. The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism: Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • Johnson, Paul. A Shopkeepers Millennium: Society and Revivals in Rochester, New York, 1815–1837. New York: Hill and Wang, 2004.
    • Juster, Susan. Disorderly Women: Sexual Politics and Evangelicalism in Revolutionary New England. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1994.
    • Lerner, Gerda. The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina: Pioneers for Women’s Rights and Abolition. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009.
    • Makdisi, Ussama. Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2008.
    • McDaniel, W. Caleb. The Problem of Democracy in the Age of Slavery: Garrisonian Abolitionists and Transatlantic Reform. Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2013.
    • Muncy, Raymond Lee. Sex and Marriage in Utopian Communities: 19th Century America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1973.
    • Newman, Richard S., The Transformation of American Abolitionism: Fighting Slavery in the Early Republic. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2002.
    • Ryan, Mary P. Cradle of the Middle Class: The Family in Oneida County, New York, 1790–1865. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981.
    • Ryan, Susan M. The Grammar of Good Intentions: Race and the Antebellum Culture of Benevolence. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2003.
    • Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016.
    • Stewart, James Brewer. Holy Warriors: The Abolitionists and American Slavery. New York: Hill and Wang, 1996.
    • Tomek, Beverly C. Colonization and Its Discontents: Emancipation, Emigration, and Antislavery in Antebellum Pennsylvania. New York: New York University Press, 2011.
    • Walters, Ronald. American Reformers, 1815–1860. New York: Hill and Wang, 1997

    Notes

    1. Sam Haselby, The Origins of American Religious Nationalism (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015), 170.
    2. Leigh Eric Schmidt, Holy Fairs: Scotland and the Making of American Revivalism (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2001).
    3. John B. Boles, The Great Revival: The Origins of the Southern Evangelical Mind (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1972).
    4. Charles G. Finney, Memoirs of Charles G. Finney (New York: Revell, 1876), 78.
    5. John H. Wigger, Taking Heaven by Storm: Methodism and the Rise of Popular Christianity in America (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998), 3, 197–200, 201n1
    6. Gary J. Dorrien, The Making of American Liberal Theology: Imagining Progressive Religion, 1805–1900, Volume 1 (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2001), 119.
    7. David Edwin Harrell, A Social History of the Disciples Christ: Quest for a Christian America, 1800–1865 (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1966).
    8. Joseph Smith, “History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834,” Joseph Smith Papers. http://josephsmithpapers.org/paperSummary/history-1838-1856-volume-a-1-23-december-1805-30-august-1834, accessed July 8, 2015.
    9. Philip F. Gura, American Transcendentalism: A History (New York: Hill and Wang, 2008), 5.
    10. Ralph Waldo Emerson, “The American Scholar.” http://digitalemerson.wsulibs.wsu.edu/exhibits/show/text/the-american-scholar, accessed May 6, 2018; Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Self Reliance,” in Essays, First Series. http://digitalemerson.wsulibs.wsu.edu/exhibits/show/text/first-series/self-reliance, accessed May 6, 2018.
    11. Henry David Thoreau, Walden, and On the Duty of Civil Disobedience. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/205/205-h/205-h.htm, accessed May 6, 2018
    12. Sterling F. Delano, Brook Farm: The Dark Side of Utopia (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009).
    13. Robert A. Gross and Mary Kelley, eds., A History of the Book in America: Volume 2: An Extensive Republic: Print Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790–1840(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010), 112.
    14. Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself (Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845). http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/douglass/douglass.html.
    15. Christopher Leslie Brown, Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012).
    16. David Brion Davis, “The Emergence of Immediatism in British and American Antislavery Thought,” Journal of American History 49, no. 2 (September 1962): 209–230.
    17. Lori D. Ginzberg, Women and the Work of Benevolence: Morality, Politics, and Class in the Nineteenth Century (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1990).
    18. Michael P. Young, Bearing Witness Against Sin: The Evangelical Birth of the American Social Movement (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006), 74–75.
    19. Milton A. Maxwell, “Washingtonian Movement,” Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol 11 (1950): 410.
    20. Jack S. Blocker, American Temperance Movements: Cycles of Reform (Boston: Hall, 1989).
    21. David Paul Nord, Faith in Reading: Religious Publishing and the Birth of Mass Media in America (New York: Oxford University Press, 222), 85.
    22. Emily Conroy-Krutz, Christian Imperialism: Converting the World in the Early American Republic (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2015).
    23. Jeremiah Evarts, Essays on the Present Crisis in the Condition of the American Indians: First Published in the National Intelligencer, Under the Signature of William Penn(Boston: Perkins and Marvin, 1829) http://eco.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.51209/3?r=0&s=1.
    24. Worcester v. Georgia (1832). https://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/31/515.
    25. Catharine Beecher, “Circular Addressed to the Benevolent Ladies of the U. States,” December 25, 1829, in Theda Purdue and Michael D. Green, eds., The Cherokee Removal: A Brief History with Documents, 2nd ed. (Boston: Bedford St. Martin’s, 2005), 111–114.
    26. See, for example, David Walker, Walker’s Appeal (Boston: Walker, 1829) and James Forten, Letters from A Man of Colour (Philadelphia: s.n., 1813).
    27. Paul Goodman, Of One Blood: Abolitionism and the Origins of Racial Equality (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998), 105
    28. James Brewer Stewart, Abolitionist Politics and the Coming of the Civil War (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2008), 13–14.
    29. Beverly C. Tomek, Pennsylvania Hall: A “Legal Lynching” in the Shadow of the Liberty Bell (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013).
    30. Reinhard O. Johnson, The Liberty Party, 1840–1848: Antislavery Third-Party Politics in the United States (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2009).
    31. Philip Gould, “The Rise, Development, and Circulation of the Slave Narrative,” in The Cambridge Companion to the African American Slave Narrative, ed. Audrey Fisch (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2007), 24.
    32. Barbara Welter, “The Cult of True Womanhood: 1820–1860,” American Quarterly 18, no. 2 (1966): 151–174.
    33. Gerda Lerner, The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina: Pioneers for Women’s Rights and Abolition (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009).
    34. “Declaration of Sentiments,” in Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 1 (Rochester, NY: Fowler and Wells, 1889), 70–71. http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/senecafalls.asp.
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