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24: Writing Terminology

  • Page ID
    172702
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    Writing Mechanics

    Everything we write is evaluated for writing mechanics. Sometimes the evaluation comes as a grade for a class or sometimes your boss is evaluating you, through your written work, for increased responsibility and other opportunities. Both evaluations are important milestones in professional development: they can both lead to new and interesting personal and professional challenges. The chapters in this final part of The Tongue and Quill provide essential guidance on writing mechanics to help you on your way to new challenges and opportunities on the horizon. Consider these "funny signs." What did the author mean and what was actually said? Clearly these authors need some improvement in their writing mechanics.

    Funny Signs

    1. IN A LAUNDROMAT:
      Automatic washing machines. Please remove all your clothes when the light goes out.
    2. IN A LONDON DEPARTMENT STORE:
      Bargain Basement Upstairs
    3. OUTSIDE A SECOND-HAND SHOP: We exchange anything-bicycles, washing machines etc. Why not bring your wife along and get a wonderful bargain.
    4. QUICKSAND WARNING:
      Quicksand. Any person passing this point will be drowned. By order of the District Council.
    5. NOTICE IN A DRY CLEANER’S WINDOW:
      Anyone leaving their garments here for more than 30 days will be disposed of.
    6. IN A HEALTH FOOD SHOP WINDOW:
      Closed due to illness.
    7. SPOTTED IN A SAFARI PARK:
      Elephants Please Stay In Your Car
    8. SEEN DURING A CONFERENCE:
      For anyone who has children and doesn’t know it, there is a day care on the first floor.
    9. NOTICE IN A FIELD:
      The farmer allows walkers to cross the field for free, but the bull charges.
    10. MESSAGE ON A LEAFLET:
      If you cannot read, this leaflet will tell you how to get lessons.
    11. ON A REPAIR SHOP DOOR:
      We can repair anything (Please knock hard on the door-the bell doesn’t work).
    12. SPOTTED IN A TOILET IN A LONDON OFFICE BLOCK:
      Toilet out of order. Please use floor below.

    This chapter covers:

    • Common Grammatical and Writing Terms
    • Irregular Verbs

    The Tongue and Quill is not an all-inclusive style manual. This chapter and those that follow provide Air Force personnel with a quick-reference guide to cure the most common trouble spots and to encourage standardization of Air Force oral presentations and written products. There are many style manuals available and no two are exactly alike. Commonly used style guides include the MLA Style Guide from the Modern Language Association, the Chicago Manual of Style, the APA Style Guide from the American Psychological Association, the Air University Style Guide for Writers and Editors, and the US Government Printing Office Style Manual, to name a few. The Air University Style Guide and The Tongue and Quill are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, and most of the presentations/papers produced in professional military education courses follow the Air University Style Guide or The Tongue and Quill.


    This page titled 24: Writing Terminology is shared under a Public Domain license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by US Air Force (US Department of Defense) .

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