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Humanities Libertexts

7.1: Comma

  • Page ID
    6954
  • Practice 1

    1. Use a comma before a coordinate conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet) in a compound sentence.

    I am not complaining, but I am stating my opinion.

    1. Commas are usually used after introductory words, phrases, and clauses.

    When you leave today, remember your umbrella.
    From the roof, I could see for miles.
    Furthermore, I would like you to mow the lawn.
    Yes, Santa Claus, there is no Virginia.

    1. Use commas to set off items in a series of three or more.

    Of the letters X, Y, and Z, I prefer Z.

    Insert commas as needed in the following sentences. Not all sentences need commas.

    1. Laura was tired exhausted and frustrated after such a busy day.
    2. In addition she was running a temperature of 102.
    3. When I was younger I was afraid of the lawnmower man.
    4. My son was afraid of spiders when he was younger.
    5. Sandra worked during the day and she attended Dalton State on Monday nights.
    6. Laura worked nights and attended Dalton State during the day.
    7. I admire your problem but I don't have any solutions to offer you.
    8. If you don't mind it is my turn to have a crisis.
    9. Tom Lizzy and Geoffrey drove to Playalinda and surfed all afternoon.
    10. In need of water the desperate travelers searched for an oasis.
    11. I was going to do the dishes but I was distracted.
    12. During the bomb scare teachers held classes outside on the lawn.
    13. Since it was snowing we did not enjoy having class outside.
    14. After sitting in the snow for 10 minutes I began to freeze.
    15. For example I enjoy reading walking and singing.
    Answer:

    Comma Rules - Practice 1 Answer Key

    Practice 2

    1. Use a comma before a coordinate conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet) in a compound sentence.

    I am not complaining, but I am stating my rather unhappy opinion.

    1. Commas are usually used after introductory words, phrases, and clauses.

    When you leave today, remember your umbrella.
    From the roof, I could see for miles.
    Furthermore, I would like you to mow the lawn.
    Yes, Santa Claus, there is no Virginia.

    1. Use commas to set off items in a series of three or more.

    Of the letters X, Y, and Z, I prefer Z.

    1. Use commas to set off coordinate adjectives not joined by and.

    The tired, ambitious clerk usually worked through lunch and stayed late.

    Insert commas as needed in the following sentences. Not all sentences need commas.

    1. In the mid-1970s I had a diabolical intelligent dog named Moonbear.
    2. Moonbear was a smart quick and hungry dog.
    3. He was also a very useful dog for he had the ability to scare off would-be intruders.
    4. Of all his amazing tricks the one that amazed me the most was his speed.
    5. When he was hungry he could move at incredible unimaginable speeds.
    6. For example I once removed a freshly baked cherry pie from the oven and I put it on the center of the dining room table to cool.
    7. Before I knew what was happening Moonbear jumped onto the table and began eating the hot cherry pie.
    8. He had eaten half of the pie before I was able to stop him.
    9. After the cherry pie incident I was more careful where I put baked goods to cool.
    10. However even the top of the refrigerator was not safe from Moonbear.
    Answer:

    Comma Rules - Practice 2 Answer Key

    Practice 3

    1. Use a comma before a coordinate conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet) in a compound sentence.

    I am not complaining, but I am stating my rather unhappy opinion.

    1. Commas are usually used after introductory words, phrases, and clauses.

    When you leave today, remember your umbrella.
    From the roof, I could see for miles.
    Furthermore, I would like you to mow the lawn.
    Yes, Santa Claus, there is no Virginia.

    1. Use commas to set off items in a series of three or more.

    Of the letters X, Y, and Z, I prefer Z.

    1. Use commas to set off coordinate adjectives not joined by and.

    The tired, ambitious clerk usually worked through lunch and stayed late.

    1. Use commas around words, phrases, and clauses that interrupt the flow of a sentence (and are not essential to the meaning).

    I never was, by the way, a hippie.
    She was, however, too tired to continue studying.
    My sister, who lives in Tallahassee, is a talented artist.

    Insert commas as needed in the following sentences. Not all sentences need commas. Write the rule number that justifies your use of the comma.

    1. When I was in college I used to wear garlands of clover in my hair.
    2. Some of these garlands would have extensions of flowers that hung to the ground.
    3. My professors pretended not to notice but I suspected that they did.
    4. I was however an A student and I believed my As justified my flowery whimsical appearance.
    5. My reasoning wild as it may seem convinced my parents that they need not worry about me.
    6. I eventually quit wearing garlands of flowers married a manipulative self-centered musician and had a son.
    7. Though my son did not wear flowers in his hair he did experiment with his hair color his hairstyles and his clothing.
    8. One afternoon before my night class he asked me to help him dye his blonde hair black.
    9. He assured me that we would be using nonpermanent hair coloring so I helped him.
    10. As you might have guessed the color of course was permanent and I ended up going to class that night with black hands and black fingernails.
    Answer:

    Comma Rules - Practice 3 Answer Key

    Practice 4

    1. Use a comma before a coordinate conjunction (and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet) in a compound sentence.

    I am not complaining, but I am stating my rather unhappy opinion.

    1. Commas are usually used after introductory words, phrases, and clauses.

    When you leave today, remember your umbrella.
    From the roof, I could see for miles.
    Furthermore, I would like you to mow the lawn.
    Yes, Santa Claus, there is no Virginia.

    1. Use commas to set off items in a series of three or more.

    Of the letters X, Y, and Z, I prefer Z.

    1. Use commas to set off coordinate adjectives not joined by and.

    The tired, ambitious clerk usually worked through lunch and stayed late.

    1. Use commas around words, phrases, and clauses that interrupt the flow of a sentence (and are not essential to the meaning).

    I never was, by the way, a hippie.
    She was, however, too tired to continue studying.

    1. Use commas to set off contrasted elements, geographical names, and most items in dates.

    Cats, but not dogs, own themselves.
    Maria was born in Rockledge, Florida, on August 16, 2002, at 10:20 p.m.

    Insert commas as needed in the following sentences. Not all sentences need commas. Write the rule number that justifies your use of the comma.

    1. My family lived in Florence Italy during my high school years.
    2. After hearing her excuse I still did not believe her.
    3. That's a bathing suit top not a piece of string.
    4. Amelia wore sensible durable clothing.
    5. Chris ran out the door jumped over the fence and raced down the road.
    6. The movie was boring meaningless and confusing.
    7. Maria opened her math book and then began doing problems 1 through 10.
    8. When you write an essay state your thesis clearly.
    9. I will walk on the treadmill or I will walk in the park.
    10. Laura lived in Island Grove Florida before moving to Dalton Georgia.
    11. The explanation such as it was could not be believed by any rational person.
    12. I removed the blackberry pie from the oven and put it on the window sill to cool.
    13. Although there are many different comma rules they can be learned.
    14. I will explain them to you if you wish.
    15. If you will stop nagging I will empty the trash wash the dishes and do the laundry.
    Answer:

    Comma Rules - Practice 4 Answer Key

    References

    • Dr. Mary Nielsen, Dean of the Dalton State College School of Liberal Arts.
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