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6.12: MLA Works Cited Pages

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    148224
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    In MLA style, each source cited in the text of your paper refers readers to the list of works cited, a complete list of all the sources you quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Every source cited in the text of your paper must be included in the works-cited list, and every source in the works-cited list must be cited in the text of your paper.

    Format of the List of Works Cited

    After the last page of the paper, start a new page with the centered title “Works Cited” at the top. Create an entry for each source using the following guidelines and examples:

    • Begin each entry at the left margin, and indent subsequent lines one-half inch. (In Microsoft Word, you can also highlight the entire page when you are finished and select “Hanging” from the Special options on the Indentation section of the Paragraph menu.)
    • Alphabetize the entries according to authors’ last names. If two or more authors have the same last name, alphabetize by first name or initial. Alphabetize sources with unknown authors by the first word of the title, excluding a, an, or the.
    • Double-space the entire page.

    Core Elements

    Each entry in the list of works cited consists of core elements:

    • Author. Who is responsible for the work?
    • Title. What is the work called?
    • Publication information. Where can the work be found so that others can consult it? Publication information includes the date of publication and any larger work, which MLA calls a “container,” in which a shorter work is published, such as a journal, magazine, newspaper, database, streaming service, and so on.
      A note on access dates. Although access dates for online sources are not required, MLA acknowledges that an access date can indicate the version of a source you consulted. If you add an access date, place it at the end of the works-cited entry in this format: “Accessed 4 Apr. 2020.” Ask your instructors whether they require access dates.

    Works Cited Tools and Templates

    Online tools such as NoodleTools and Citation Machine can generate works cited entries automatically; just be sure to double-check that the entries are correct according to the MLA rules below.  You can also make a copy of Columbia College's Word MLA template or Google docs MLA template and then put in your own content.

    How to List Different Types of Authors and Contributors 

    General rules

    • Authors. Give the author’s last name, a comma, the author’s first name and any middle name or middle initial, and then a period. For works with more than one author, an organization as an author, or an unknown author, see the models below.
    • Contributors. People who contributed to the work in addition to the author are called contributors. Refer to them by their role in a phrase such as “adapted by,” “directed by,” “edited by,” “illustrated by,” “introduction by,” “narrated by,” “performance by,” and “translated by.” (See Models 19, 20, 21, 30, and 58 for examples.)

    Specific cases

    Book: one author

    Sotomayor, Sonia. My Beloved World. Vintage Books, 2013.

    Book: two authors

    Kristoff, Nicholas D., and Sheryl WuDunn. Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Alfred A. Knopf, 2009.

    Book: three or more authors

    Barlow, David H., et al. Abnormal Psychology: An Integrative Approach. 8th ed., Cengage Learning, 2017.

    Book: two or more works by the same author

    When you cite two works by the same author, use three hyphens in place of the author’s name, and alphabetize the works by title:

    Trethewey, Natasha. Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir. Ecco, 2020.

    ---. Native Guard: Poems. Mariner Books, 2007.

    Book author and editor

    Add the editor’s name after the title:

    Hemingway, Ernest. Conversations with Ernest Hemingway, edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli, UP of Mississippi, 1986.

    Book author and translator

    Add the translator’s name after the title:

    Ferrante, Elena. My Brilliant Friend. Translated by Ann Goldstein, Europa Editions, 2012.

    If you are citing the work of the translator, place the translator’s name in the author position:

    Goldstein, Ann, translator. My Brilliant Friend. By Elena Ferrante, Europa Editions, 2012.

    Book author and illustrator

    Add the illustrator’s name after the title. If you are citing the work of the illustrator, place the illustrator’s name in the author position, as shown in the preceding example:

    Fasler, Joe. Light in the Dark: Writers on Creativity, Inspiration, and the Artistic Process. Illustrated by Doug McLean, Penguin Books, 2017.

    Work by an organization, a government, a corporation, or an association

    ​​​​​​​If the author and publisher are not the same, start with the author:

    United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration. Healthy Living Resource Guide. Government Printing Office, 2020.

    If the author and the publisher are the same, give the title of the work in place of the author, and list the organization as the publisher:

    MLA Handbook. 8th ed., Modern Language Association of America, 2016.

    “This Is Who We Are.” U.S. Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Mar. 2019, www.fs.usda.gov/sites/default/files/This-is-Who-We-Are.pdf.

    Unknown author

    If no author is given, start with the title.

    “The Most Beautiful Battalion in the Army.” Grunt Magazine, 1968, pp. 12-15.

    ​​​​​​​Articles in Journals, Magazines, and Newspapers

    Articles, reviews, editorials, and other short works are published in journals, newspapers, and magazines. They appear in print, on databases, and on websites (though often through a paywall). As a student, you are likely to access many articles and other short research sources primarily through databases available through your library.

    Basic format for a journal article in a database

    ​​​​​​​Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Journal, volume number, issue number, Date of Publication, page numbers. Title of Database, DOI or URL.

    • Author. Give the last name, a comma, the first name, and any middle name or initial. Do not list an author’s professional title, such as Dr. or PhD. End with a period.
    • Title of the article. Give the full title and any subtitle, separating them with a colon. Capitalize all significant words in the title. Put the title of the article in quotation marks. End with a period inside the closing quotation mark.
    • Title of the journal. Put the title of the journal in italics. Capitalize all significant words in the title. End the title with a comma.
    • Volume and issue numbers. Use the abbreviations vol. and no. followed by the number and a comma.
    • Publication date. Give the month or season and the year of publication, if available. Use the following abbreviations for months: Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., and Dec. Do not abbreviate May, June, or July.
    • Page numbers. Give p. (singular) or pp. (plural) and the page number or numbers of the article, followed by a period.
    • Title of the database. Put the database title in italics, followed by a comma.
    • Location. Give a DOI if available, and end with a period. If there is no DOI, give a URL, preferably a permalink, without http://.

    Article in an academic journal

    ​​​​​​​Database
    Daddis, Gregory A. “Out of Balance: Evaluating American Strategy in Vietnam, 1968–72.” War & Society, vol. 32, no. 3, Oct. 2013, pp. 252-70. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1179/0729247313Z.00000000026.

    • Print
      Daddis, Gregory A. “Out of Balance: Evaluating American Strategy in Vietnam, 1968–72.” War & Society, vol. 32, no. 3, Oct. 2013, pp. 252-70.
    • Online
      Squires, Scot. “Do Generations Differ When It Comes to Green Values and Products?” Electronic Green Journal, no. 42, 2019, escholarship.org/uc/item/6f91213q.
      The journal in the example numbers issues only, so no volume number is given.

    Article in a weekly or biweekly magazine

    ​​​​​​​To cite an article in a weekly or biweekly magazine, give the author, title of the article, title of the magazine, publication date (day, month, year), and page numbers. If you found the article through a database, add the title of the database and a DOI or URL. If you found the article online, add the URL.

    • Database
      Sanneh, Kelefa. “The Color of Money.” The New Yorker, 8 Feb. 2021, pp. 26-31. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=aph&AN=148411685&site=ehost-live&scope=site.
    • Print
      Sanneh, Kelefa. “The Color of Money.” The New Yorker, 8 Feb. 2021, pp. 26-31.
    • Online
      Ferrer, Ada. “My Brother’s Keeper.” The New Yorker, 22 Feb. 2021, www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/ 03/01/my-brothers-keeper.

    Article in a monthly or bimonthly magazine

    ​​​​​​​To cite an article in a monthly or bimonthly magazine, give the author, title of the article, title of the magazine, publication month and year, and page numbers. If you found the article through a database, add the title of the database and a DOI or URL. If you found the article online, add the URL.

    • Database
      Sneed, Annie. “Giant Shape-Shifters.” Scientific American, Sept. 2017, pp. 20-22. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1038/ scientificamerican1017-20.
    • Print
      Sneed, Annie. “Giant Shape-Shifters.” Scientific American, Sept. 2017, pp. 20-22.
    • Online
      Stewart, Jamila. “A Look Inside the Black Designers of Canada Initiative.” Essence, July 2020, www.essence.com/fashion/black-designers-of-canada-digital-index/.

    To cite a comment on an article, see Model 54.

    Article in a newspaper

    ​​​​​​​To cite an article in a newspaper, give the author, title of the article, title of the newspaper, publication date (day, month, year), and the page numbers. If you found the article through a database, add the title of the database and a DOI or a URL. If you found the article online, add the URL.

    • Database
      Krueger, Alyson. “When Mom Knows Best, on Instagram.” The New York Times, 27 Nov. 2019, pp. B1-B4. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType =aph&AN=139891108&site=ehost-live&scope=site.
    • Print
      Krueger, Alyson. “When Mom Knows Best, on Instagram.” The New York Times, 27 Nov. 2019, pp. B1-B4.
    • Online
      Smith, Doug. “They’re Building Affordable Housing for the Homeless—Without Government Help.” Los Angeles Times, 10 Feb. 2021, www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-02-10/theyre-building-affordable-housing-for-the-homeless-without-government-hel​​​​​​​p.

    To cite a comment on an article, see Model 54.

    Editorial or letter to the editor

    ​​​​​​​An editorial may or may not have an author’s name attached to it. If it does, give the author’s name first. If it does not, start with the title. In both situations, add the designation Editorial or Letter to the Editor after the title.

    “For Better Elections, Copy the Neighbors.” Editorial. The Wall Street Journal, 16 Feb. 2021, www.wsj.com/ articles/for-better-elections-copy-the-neighbors-11613518448.

    Review

    To cite a review of a book, film, television show, or other work, give the name of the reviewer and title of the review, add Review of before the title of work being reviewed, and give the name of the work’s author, director, or creator after the title.

    Girish, Devika. “Refocusing the Lens on Race and Gender.” Review of Test Pattern, directed by Shatara Michelle Ford. The New York Times, 18 Feb. 2021, www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/movies/test-pattern-review.html.​​​​​​​

    ​​​​​​​Books and Parts of Books

    Use the following guidelines for books and parts of books, such as a selection from an anthology, an article in a collection, a published letter, and so on.

    Basic entry for a book

    Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Publisher, Year of Publication.

    • Author. Give the last name, a comma, the first name, and any middle name or initial. Do not list an author’s professional title, such as Dr. or PhD. End with a period.
    • Title of the book. Put the book’s title in italics. Give the full title and any subtitle, separating them with a colon. Capitalize all significant words in the title, even if the book’s cover does not use conventional capitalization. End the title with a period.
    • Publisher. List the publisher’s name without words such as “Inc.” or “Company.” Shorten “University Press” to “UP.” End with a comma.
    • Year of publication. Provide the publication date, and end with a period.

    Print book

    ​​​​​​​Wilkerson, Isabel. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. Vintage Books, 2010.

    E-book formatted for a specific reader device or service

    ​​​​​​​Wilkerson, Isabel. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration. Kindle ed., Vintage Books, 2010.

    Book, anthology, or collection with an editor

    Add the abbreviation ed. or eds. (if more than one) after the editor’s first name:

    Lunsford, Andrea, ed. Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition. U of Pittsburgh P, 1995.​​​​​​​

    Work in an anthology or chpater in an edited collection

    ​​​​​​​After the author and title of the work, give the title of the anthology or edited collection, name of the editor, publication information, and page numbers of the work:

    Royster, Jacqueline Jones. “To Call a Thing by Its True Name: The Rhetoric of Ida B. Wells.” Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition, edited by Andrea Lunsford, U of Pittsburgh P, 1995, pp. 167-84.

    Two or more works in an anthology or edited collection

    ​​​​​​​When you cite two or more selections from the same anthology or edited collection, list the anthology separately under the editor’s name. In the entries for the selections you cite, include the editor’s name and the page numbers on which the selections appear:

    Lipscomb, Drema R. “Sojourner Truth: A Practical Public Discourse." Lunsford, pp. 227-46.

    Lunsford, Andrea, ed. Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition. U of Pittsburgh P, 1995.

    Royster, Jacqueline Jones. “To Call a Thing by Its True Name: The Rhetoric of Ida B. Wells.” Lunsford, pp. 167-84.

    Revised or later edition

    For a book published in an edition other than the first, give the edition number after the title:

    Strunk, William, Jr., and E. B. White. The Elements of Style, 4th ed., Pearson, 2019.​​​​​​​

    Multivolume work

    For a book published in more than one volume, give the total number of volumes after the title:

    Klinger, Leslie S. The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. 2 vols., W. W. Norton, 2005.

    One volume of a multivolume work

    ​​​​​​​Klinger, Leslie S. The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes. Vol. 2, W. W. Norton, 2005.

    When each volume of a multivolume set has an individual title, list the volume’s full publication information first, followed by series information (number of volumes, dates). When separate volumes were published in different years, give inclusive dates:

    Churchill, Winston S. Triumph and Tragedy. Houghton Mifflin, 1953. Vol. 6 of The Second World War. 6 vols. 1948-53.

    However, if the volume you are using has its own title, you may cite the book without referring to the other volumes as if it were an independent publication.

    Book in a series

    Add the title of the series at the end of the entry:

    Thaiss, Christopher. Language across the Curriculum in the Elementary Grades. WAC Clearinghouse, 2011, wac.colostate.edu/books/landmarks/thaiss/. Landmark Publications in Writing Studies.​​​​​​​

    Republished book

    ​​​​​​​Give the original publication date after the title and the date the book was republished after the publisher:

    Evans, Elizabeth E. G. The Abuse of Maternity. 1875. Arno, 1974.

    Sacred text

    ​​​​​​​Give the complete title of the version you consulted followed by the name of the editor and/or translator, the edition, the publisher, and the publication date:

    The Bible. Authorized King James Version. Edited by Robert Carroll and Stephen Prickett, Oxford UP, 2008.

    The Koran. Translated by N. J. Dawood, rev. ed., Penguin Books, 2015.

    Introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword

    ​​​​​​​Start with the author of the introduction, preface, foreword, or afterword, followed by a description of the work you are citing, such as “Foreword.” Give the author of the work after the title:

    Offill, Jenny. Foreword. Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf, Penguin Classics, 2021, pp. vii-xiv.

    Published letter

    ​​​​​​​Roosevelt, Theodore. Letter to Upton Sinclair. 15 Mar. 1906. Theodore Roosevelt: Letters and Speeches, edited by Louis Auchincloss, 2004, pp. 310-11.

    Conference paper

    ​​​​​​​Killi, Stainer, and Andrew Morrison. “Could the Food Market Pull 3D Printing Appetites Further?” Industry 4.0—Shaping the Future of the Digital World: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Sustainable & Smart Manufacturing, edited by Paulo Bartolo et al., CRC Press, 2021, pp. 197-203.

    ​​​​​​​Websites and Parts of Websites

    Use the following guidelines for works that are published only online and do not have an overarching publication, such as a journal, newspaper, magazine, or database.

    Basic format for a short work or page on a website

    ​​​​​​​Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Short Work.” Title of Website, Publisher, Publication Date, URL.

    • Author. Give the last name, a comma, the first name, and any middle name or initial. Do not list an author’s professional title, such as Dr. or PhD. End with a period.
    • Title of the short work. Put the title in quotation marks. Give the full title and any subtitle, separating them with a colon. Capitalize all significant words in the title. End with a period inside the closing quotation mark.
    • Title of the website. Put the title of the website in italics. Capitalize all significant words in the title. End the title with a comma.
    • Publisher. If the publisher of the website is different from the title of the website (as shown in Model 48), give it next, followed by a comma. If they are the same (as shown in Model 47), give only the title of the website.
    • Publication date. Give the day, month, and year the work was posted, if available. Use the following abbreviations for months: Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., and Dec. Do not abbreviate May, June, and July.
    • URL. Give the URL, without “http://.”

    Short work or page on a website

    Shetterly, Margot Lee. “Katherine Johnson Biography.” NASA, 24 Feb. 2020, www.nasa.gov/content/katherine-johnson-biography.

    If the source you are citing has no author listed, start with the title. If the page has no title, give the name of the site and a descriptive label, such as “Home page” or “Blog post.”​​​​​​​

    Blog post

    ​​​​​​​Blazich, Frank A. “The Cold Morning of the Day After.” Smithsonian Voices, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 Feb. 2021, www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-history/2021/02/05/cold-morning-day-after/.

    Entire website

    ​​​​​​​Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Yale U, 2021, beinecke.library.yale.edu/.

    If the website lists an editor, give the person’s name as you would an author, followed by a comma and ed.

    Wiki

    ​​​​​​​“Coronavirus.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 Feb. 2021, en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronavirus.

    ​​​​​​​Social Media

    Basic format for a social media post

    ​​​​​​​Author. “Text of untitled post” or “Title of post” or Descriptive label. Title of Site, Date of Post, Time of Post, URL.

    • Author. Give the author’s handle and name. End with a period.
    • Text, title, or description of post. Match the capitalization exactly, add quotation marks, and end with a period inside the closing quotation mark.
    • Title of the social media site. Put the title of the site in italics, ending with a comma.
    • Publication date and time. Give the day, month, year, and time of the post. Use the following abbreviations for months: Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., and Dec. Do not abbreviate May, June, and July.
    • URL. Give the URL, without “http://.”

    Social media post

    ​​​​​​​@Holleratcha (James Holler). “People go out and vote tomorrow!” Twitter, 2 Nov. 2020, 2:08 p.m., twitter.com/ holleratcha/status/1270432672544784384.

    Death Valley National Park. “What does it mean to protect something you love?” Facebook, 23 Feb. 2021, 5:01 p.m., www.facebook.com/DeathValleyNPS/posts/4108808255810092.

    See Model 54 for how to cite a comment.

    Online forum post

    ​​​​​​​@Duckpond318. “Turkeys in the arboretum.” Reddit, 15 Mar. 2021, 11:22 a.m., www.reddit.com/r/Wildlife/ comments/lqlbo3/turkeys_in_the_arboretum/. Accessed 4 Feb. 2021.

    Online comment

    ​​​​​​​AKJersey. Comment on “Can We Stop Fighting about Charter Schools?” The New York Times, 22 Feb. 2021, www.nytimes.com/2021/02/22/opinion/charter-schools-democrats.html#commentsContainer.

    ​​​​​​​Personal Communication

    Use the following guidelines to cite email, text messages, and letters that you sent or received.

    Email

    ​​​​​​​Roberts, Jeffrey. “Study results.” Received by Kenneth Berg, 21 Oct. 2020.

    Text message

    ​​​​​​​Roberts, Jeffrey. “Study results.” Received by Kenneth Berg, 21 Oct. 2020.

    Personal letter

    ​​​​​​​Atwood, Margaret. Letter to the author. 11 Mar. 2007.

    ​​​​​​​Video, Audio, and Other Media Sources

    Use the following guidelines to cite various media sources.

    Film

    ​​​​​​​Begin with the title, followed by the director, the studio, and the year released.

    Casablanca. Directed by Michael Curtiz, Warner Brothers, 1942.

    You may also cite other contributors and their roles after the title (as illustrated below). If your paper is concerned with a particular person’s work on a film, such as the director, an actor, or someone else, begin with that person’s name and arrange all other information accordingly. For a film you stream, add the title of the streaming service and the URL:

    Moonlight. Directed by Barry Jenkins, performances by Mahershala Ali, Naomie Harris, and Trevante Rhodes. A24, 2016. Netflix, www.netflix.com/watch/80121348?trackId=13752289&tctx=8%2C.

    Online video

    ​​​​​​​NASA. “Apollo 11 Moonwalk – Original NASA EVA Mission Video.” 20 July 1969. YouTube, 17 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9HdPi9Ikhk.

    Television series or episode

    ​​​​​​​TV Series
    The Good Place. Michael Schur, creator. NBC, 2016-20.

    • Streamed TV episode
      “Jason Mendoza.” The Good Place, season 1, episode 4, NBC, 2016. Netflix, www.netflix.com/watch/ 80191852?trackId=13752289&tctx=%2C%2C.

    Advertisement

    ​​​​​​​Print
    XOFLUZA. Flu medication advertisement. The New Yorker, 8. Feb. 2021, pp. 5-6.

    • Online
      General Motors. “Will Ferrell Super Bowl Ad.” YouTube, 3 Feb. 2021, www.youtube.com/ watch?v=mdsPvbSpB2Y&t=24s.

    Cartoon or comic

    ​​​​​​​Print
    Davis, Jim. “Garfield.” Cartoon. Courier [Findlay, OH], 17 May 1996, p. 18.
    If the source you cite appears in a local newspaper, as it does here, give the city and state in brackets after the name of the newspaper if the city is not part of the newspaper’s name.

    • Online
      Gauld, Tom. “Waiting for Godot to Join the Zoom Meeting.” You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack, 31 Jan. 2021, myjetpack.tumblr.com/.

    Painting or other visual artwork

    ​​​​​​​Original work
    Rivera, Diego. Detroit Industry Murals. 1932-33. Detroit Institute of Art.
    If the city is not part of the name of the museum, add it after museum. For example, if the work you viewed was at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, you would end the entry as follows: Museum of Modern Art, New York.

    • Reproduction
      Neel, Alice. Elenka. 1936. Alice Neel: People Come First, by Kelly Baum and Randall Griffey, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2021, p. 142.
    • Online
      Basquiat, Jean-Michel. Untitled. 1983. Museum of Modern Art, www.moma.org/collection/works/ 63997?artist_id=370&page=1&sov_referrer=artist. Accessed 24 Sept. 2020.

    Map, chart, or diagram

    ​​​​​​​Print
    Everglades National Park. National Geographic Society Maps, 2019.

    • Online
      “Map: Expedition of Lewis and Clark.” National Park Service, 2 Jan. 2018, nps.gov/subjects/ travellewisandclark/map.htm.

    Sound recording

    ​​​​​​​Sound recordings include songs, albums, and spoken word. If you stream a sound recording or watch a performance online, add the name of the streaming service, such as Spotify, Apple Music, or Amazon Music, after the date. If you access the recording online, add the name of the website and the URL after the date.

    • Album
      Prince. Purple Rain. Warner Brothers, 1984.
    • Song
      The Supremes. “Baby Love.” Where Did Our Love Go, Motown, 1964. Spotify.
    • Online
      Gorman, Amanda. “The Hill We Climb.” 20 Jan. 2021, YouTube, www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZ055ilIiN4.

    Radio

    ​​​​​​​The Road to Higher Ground. Hosted by Jonathan Overby. WPR, 9 Jan. 2021.

    If you listened to the radio program online, add the URL after the date.

    Podcast

    ​​​​​​​McEvers, Kelly, host. “This Is Not a Joke.” Embedded, season 9, episode 2, NPR, 7 Nov. 2019, Apple Podcasts.

    If you listened to the podcast on the web, add the URL instead of the podcast service.

    Interview

    Broadcast
    Wilkerson, Isabel. Interview. Fresh Air, NPR, 4 Aug. 2020.

    • Online
      Sowell, Thomas. Interview. Hoover Institution, 3 Jan. 2015, www.wsj.com/video/uncommon-knowledg-thomas-sowell-basic-economics/51837CB6-9FF2-305AE55D179A.html.
    • Personal interview
      Wong, Diana. Personal interview. 12 Sept. 2020.​​​​​​​

    Video game, software, or app

    ​​​​​​​Houser, Dan, et al., writers. Grand Theft Auto V. Rockstar Games, 2013. Xbox 360.

    ​​​​​​​Other Sources

    Live lecture, speech, address, or reading

    ​​​​​​​Diaz, Shanna. “Your Dazzling Brain: The Symphony of Sleep.” Community Lecture Series, University of New Mexico Health Science and the City of Albuquerque, 13 Mar. 2018, Albuquerque Academy.

    Live performance

    ​​​​​​​Hamilton. By Lin-Manuel Miranda, directed by Thomas Kail, 11 Mar. 2018, CIBC Theater, Chicago.

    If you watch a video of a performance online, cite it as you would cite an online video.

    Letter in an archive

    ​​​​​​​Mucklestone, Ada. Letter to Maj. Gen. Ralph J. Olson. 6 Nov. 1958. Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Alphabetical Subject File, 1950-66, 1715, Box 13.

    Dissertation

    Database
    Park, Eun Jung. Korean American Artists and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots. 2013. U of California, San Diego, PhD dissertation. ProQuest, www.proquest.com/doc-view/1425303659.

    • Print
      Boothby, Daniel W. The Determinants of Earnings and Occupation for Young Women. 1978. U of California, Berkeley, PhD dissertation.

    Pamphlet

    ​​​​​​​“Facts about Fallout.” Civil Defense Administration, 1961.

    Attributions

    Adapted by Anna Mills from Writing Guide with Handbook by Michelle Bachelor Robinson, Maria Jerskey, featuring Toby Fulwiler, published by OpenStax in 2021 and licensed CC BY.


    6.12: MLA Works Cited Pages is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by OpenStax.